Format
Sort by
Items per page

Send to

Choose Destination

Search results

Items: 1 to 20 of 37617

1.
Medicine (Baltimore). 2018 Sep;97(37):e11998. doi: 10.1097/MD.0000000000011998.

CYP2D6 genotypes in revolving door patients with bipolar disorders: A case series.

Author information

1
Geriatric Unit and Gerontology-Geriatrics Research Laboratory, Department of Medical Sciences, IRCCS "Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza", San Giovanni Rotondo, Foggia.
2
Neurodegenerative Disease Unit, Department of Basic Medicine, Neuroscience, and Sense Organs, University of Bari "Aldo Moro", Bari.
3
Laboratory of Clinical Chemistry, Department of Clinical Pathology, IRCCS "Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza", San Giovanni Rotondo.
4
Psychiatric Unit, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Foggia, Foggia.
5
Institute of Neurology, Catholic University of Sacred Heart, Rome.
6
Department of Clinical Research in Neurology, Neurodegenerative Disease Unit, University of Bari "Aldo Moro", Azienda Ospedaliera "Card. G. Panico", Tricase, Lecce, Italy.

Abstract

RATIONALE:

In psychiatric disorders, interindividual differences in cytochrome P450 (CYP)2D6 (CYP2D6) enzymatic activity could be responsible of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) and therapeutic failures (TFs) for CYP2D6-metabolized drugs, contributing to the periodical hospital readmissions of the revolving door (RD) condition.

PATIENT CONCERNS:

We investigated CYP2D6 genotypes in a controlled series of 5 consecutive RD patients with Bipolar Disorder (BD).

DIAGNOSES:

Psychiatric patients affected by Bipolar Disorder.

INTERVENTIONS:

We defined TFs as a difference at the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale score ΔBPRS < 25% at each 1-week of stable treatment, and ADRs as the onset of extrapyramidal symptoms and/or metabolic impairment with weight gain.

OUTCOMES:

At 3 months, a mean number of 2.75 ± 1.26 ADR and a mean ΔBPRS score of 16.07 ± 0.05% were observed. At 6 months of follow-up, compared to the only patient without BD (ΔBPRS < 32.10%), BD patients (n = 4) showed TFs (ΔBPRS < 25%). CYP2D6 genotyping revealed intermediate metabolizer phenotypes for BD patients and an extensive metabolizer phenotype for the patient without BD. In BD patients, the ratio of drugs maintained/discontinued for TFs or ADRs was 1.75 for non-CYP2D6 versus 0.33 for CYP2D6 interacting drugs, while the proportion of ADR:TF was 0:4 versus 6:3.

LESSONS:

Our findings may suggest that CYP2D6 clinically relevant genotypes may be involved in the unwanted outcomes observed in RD patients with BD.

PMID:
30212929
DOI:
10.1097/MD.0000000000011998
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text
Icon for Wolters Kluwer
2.
Rev Bras Psiquiatr. 2018 Oct-Dec;40(4):459-460. doi: 10.1590/1516-4446-2018-0125.

Coronary calcium score as an expression of multisystemic progression of bipolar disorder.

Author information

1
Mood Disorders Psychopharmacology Unit (MDPU), Toronto Western Hospital, University Health Network (UHN), Toronto, ON, Canada.
2
Grupo de Pesquisa em Neurociência Comportamental e Molecular do Transtorno Bipolar, Departamento de Psiquiatria, Universidade Federal de São Paulo (UNIFESP), São Paulo, SP, Brazil.
3
Brain and Cognition Discovery Foundation (BCDF), Toronto, ON, Canada.
PMID:
30156658
DOI:
10.1590/1516-4446-2018-0125
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text
Icon for Scientific Electronic Library Online
3.
Rev Bras Psiquiatr. 2018 Jul-Sep;40(3):344-345. doi: 10.1590/1516-4446-2018-0037.

Transcranial magnetic stimulation in the treatment of peripartum bipolar depression: a case report.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry, New York University, New York, NY, USA.
2
Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Adventista del Plata, Entre Ríos, Argentina.
3
Department of Psychiatry, Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO, USA.
PMID:
30043897
DOI:
10.1590/1516-4446-2018-0037
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text
Icon for Scientific Electronic Library Online
5.
Trends Psychiatry Psychother. 2018;40(2):170-178. doi: 10.1590/2237-6089-2017-0121.

Validity and reliability of the Cognitive Complaints in Bipolar Disorder Rating Assessment (COBRA) in Brazilian bipolar patients.

Author information

1
Laboratório de Psiquiatria Molecular, Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre (HCPA), Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil.
2
Programa de Pós-Graduação em Psiquiatria e Ciências do Comportamento, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil.
3
Programa de Pós-Graduação em Saúde e Comportamento, Universidade Católica de Pelotas (UCPel), Pelotas, RS, Brazil.
4
Centro Universitário Ritter dos Reis, Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil.
5
Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Salud Mental (CIBERSAM), Hospital Clinic, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain.
6
Departamento de Farmacologia, UFRGS, Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

In Brazil, there is no valid instrument to measure subjective cognitive dysfunction in bipolar disorder. The present study analyzed the psychometric properties of the Cognitive Complaints in Bipolar Disorder Rating Assessment (COBRA) in Brazilian bipolar patients. We further investigated the relationship between the COBRA, objective cognitive measures, and illness course variables.

METHODS:

The total sample (N=150) included 85 bipolar disorder patients and 65 healthy controls. The psychometric properties of the COBRA (e.g., internal consistency, concurrent validity, discriminative validity, factor analyses, ROC curve, and feasibility) were analyzed.

RESULTS:

The COBRA showed a one-factor structure with very high internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha=0.890). Concurrent validity was indicated by a strong correlation with the cognitive domain of the FAST (r=0.811, p<0.001). Bipolar patients experienced greater cognitive complaints (mean=14.69; standard deviation [SD]=10.03) than healthy controls (mean=6.78; SD=5.49; p<0.001), suggesting discriminative validity of the instrument. No significant correlations were found between the COBRA and objective cognitive measures. Furthermore, higher COBRA scores were associated with residual depressive (r=0.448; p<0.001) and manic (r=0.376; p<0.001) symptoms, number of depressive episodes (r=0.306; p=0.011), number of total episodes (r=0.256; p=0.038), and suicide attempts (r=0.356; p=0.003).

CONCLUSION:

The COBRA is a valid instrument to assess cognitive complaints, and the combined use of subjective-objective cognitive measures enables the correct identification of cognitive dysfunctions in bipolar disorder.

PMID:
29995161
DOI:
10.1590/2237-6089-2017-0121
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text
Icon for Scientific Electronic Library Online
6.
Medicine (Baltimore). 2018 Jul;97(27):e11089. doi: 10.1097/MD.0000000000011089.

Elevated heat shock proteins in bipolar disorder patients with hypothalamic pituitary adrenal axis dysfunction.

Author information

1
The National Clinical Research Center for Mental Disorders and Beijing Key Laboratory of Mental Disorders, Beijing Anding Hospital, Capital Medical University.
2
Department of Biophysics and Structural Biology, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and School of Basic Medicine, Peking Union Medical College.
3
Department of Psychiatry Beijing Anding Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, People's Republic of China.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Heat shock proteins (HSP) might be useful as biomarkers for bipolar disorder (BD) which would be clinically valuable since no reliable biomarker for BD has so far been identified. The purpose of this study was to assess the heat shock proteins CPN10, CPN60, and CPN70 as potential biomarkers of BD.

METHODS:

The study included 100 BD patients recruited from a hospital during 2012 and 2013. The study also included 94 healthy controls. Among the BD patients, 33 had abnormal hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity. Blood samples were obtained from the patients and controls. The chemiluminescence method, mass spectrometry, and flow cytometry were used for analysis.

RESULTS:

The BD patients compared with the controls had a significantly lower level of CPN10 and significantly higher levels of CPN60 and CPN70. The BD patients with abnormal HPA axis activity had a significantly lower level of CPN60 compared with the normal HPA axis activity group of BD patients. The CPN60 level significantly inversely correlated with adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) level in patients with bipolar depression and in patients with bipolar hypomania, and CPN70 significantly correlated with ACTH level in patients with bipolar depression and hypomania.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our findings suggest that the heat shock proteins CPN10, CPN60, and CPN70 might have potential as biomarkers for BD and CPN60 blood level might distinguish patients with abnormal HPA axis activity from those with normal HPA axis activity.

PMID:
29979378
PMCID:
PMC6076087
DOI:
10.1097/MD.0000000000011089
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
Icon for Wolters Kluwer Icon for PubMed Central
7.
Psychiatr Danub. 2018 Jun;30(2):183-188. doi: 10.24869/psyd.2018.183.

Differences in clinical characteristics between bipolar patients with current psychotic symptoms and those who have never been psychotic.

Author information

1
Santha Kalman Psychiatric Hospital, Szabadsag ter 13, 4320, Nagykallo, Hungary, belteczkizsuzsa@gmail.com.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Psychotic symptoms are common in bipolar disorder (BD). Data suggest that BD patients with or without psychotic symptoms may differ from each other with regards to some clinical features of BD (e.g., age at onset, suicidality, psychiatric comorbidity, number of hospitalizations). However, the literature in this area is relatively scarce and not always conclusive. Therefore, the objective of the current study was to investigate whether the presence of psychotic symptoms is associated with clinical characteristics of patients with BD.

SUBJECTS AND METHODS:

We enrolled 365 hospitalized patients who were diagnosed with BD according to the ICD-10 criteria. After we excluded 196 patients without current psychotic symptoms but psychotic mood episodes in their medical history, our final sample consisted of 169 patients (i.e., 89 BD patients presenting with current psychotic symptoms and 80 BD patients who were hospitalized in the same period, but who did not have psychotic symptoms either currently or during their previous hospitalizations). Clinically available data were collected, systematized and statistically processed according to the aims of the study.

RESULTS:

Early age of onset, bipolar-I diagnosis, comorbid personality disorder, number of hospitalizations and suicidality were significantly more common in the psychotic group compared to the never-psychotic group. On the contrary, sedative/hypnotics dependence was more frequent in the never-psychotic group.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our results support the notion that the presence of psychotic symptoms in the context of BD may be associated with various other clinical features of this disease.

PMID:
29930228
DOI:
10.24869/psyd.2018.183
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text
Icon for Medicinska naklada d.o.o.
8.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2018 Jul 3;115(27):E6106-E6115. doi: 10.1073/pnas.1711978115. Epub 2018 Jun 18.

Lack of group-to-individual generalizability is a threat to human subjects research.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720; afisher@berkeley.edu.
2
Department of Psychology, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA 19104.
3
Department of Neurology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104.
4
Department of Developmental Psychology, Faculty of Behavioural and Social Sciences, Groningen University, 9712 TS Groningen, The Netherlands.

Abstract

Only for ergodic processes will inferences based on group-level data generalize to individual experience or behavior. Because human social and psychological processes typically have an individually variable and time-varying nature, they are unlikely to be ergodic. In this paper, six studies with a repeated-measure design were used for symmetric comparisons of interindividual and intraindividual variation. Our results delineate the potential scope and impact of nonergodic data in human subjects research. Analyses across six samples (with 87-94 participants and an equal number of assessments per participant) showed some degree of agreement in central tendency estimates (mean) between groups and individuals across constructs and data collection paradigms. However, the variance around the expected value was two to four times larger within individuals than within groups. This suggests that literatures in social and medical sciences may overestimate the accuracy of aggregated statistical estimates. This observation could have serious consequences for how we understand the consistency between group and individual correlations, and the generalizability of conclusions between domains. Researchers should explicitly test for equivalence of processes at the individual and group level across the social and medical sciences.

KEYWORDS:

ecological fallacy; generalizability; idiographic science; replicability; research methodology

PMID:
29915059
PMCID:
PMC6142277
[Available on 2019-01-03]
DOI:
10.1073/pnas.1711978115
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Icon for HighWire
9.
J Behav Addict. 2018 Jun 1;7(2):348-354. doi: 10.1556/2006.7.2018.47. Epub 2018 Jun 5.

At-risk gambling in patients with severe mental illness: Prevalence and associated features.

Author information

1
1 Department of Clinical and Experimental Sciences, University of Brescia , Brescia, Italy.
2
2 Department of Mental Health, ASST Spedali Civili , Brescia, Italy.

Abstract

Background and aims The primary objective of this study was to investigate the prevalence of at-risk gambling in a large, unselected sample of outpatients attending two community mental health centers, to estimate rates according to the main diagnosis, and to evaluate risk factors for gambling. Methods All patients attending the centers were evaluated with the Canadian Problem Gambling Index and the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview. Diagnoses were checked with the treating psychiatrists and after a chart review of the university hospital discharge diagnoses. Results The rate of at-risk gambling in 900 patients was 5.3%. In those who gambled over the last year, 10.1% were at-risk gamblers. The rates in the main diagnostic groups were: 4.7% schizophrenia and related disorders, 4.9% bipolar disorder, 5.6% unipolar depression, and 6.6% cluster B personality disorder. In 52.1% of the cases, at-risk gambling preceded the onset of a major psychiatric disorder. In a linear regression analysis, a family history of gambling disorder, psychiatric comorbidities, drug abuse/dependence, and tobacco smoking were significantly associated with at-risk gambling. Discussion and conclusion The results of this study evidenced a higher rate of at-risk gambling compared to community estimates and call for a careful screening for gambling in the general psychiatric population.

KEYWORDS:

bipolar disorder; depression; gambling; personality disorders; schizophrenia

PMID:
29865864
PMCID:
PMC6174579
DOI:
10.1556/2006.7.2018.47
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
Icon for Atypon Icon for PubMed Central
10.
Life Sci. 2018 Aug 15;207:246-252. doi: 10.1016/j.lfs.2018.05.031. Epub 2018 May 17.

Evaluation of antioxidant potencial of novel CaAl and NiAl layered double hydroxides loaded with olanzapine.

Author information

1
Núcelo de Controle de Qualidade de Medicamentos e Correlatos, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Recife, PE, Brazil.
2
Laboratório de Tecnologia de Medicamentos, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Recife, PE, Brazil.
3
Laboratório de Neuroquímica Experimental, Universidade Federal do Piauí, Teresina, PI, Brazil.
4
Laboratório Interdisciplinar de Materiais Avançados - LIMAV, Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências dos Materiais, Universidade Federal do Piauí.
5
Departamento de Fisiologia, Universidade Federal de Sergipe, Aracajú, SE, Brazil.
6
Laboratório de Tecnologia de Medicamentos, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Recife, PE, Brazil. Electronic address: joselamartine@hotmail.com.

Abstract

Olanzapine (OLZ), is used in the treatment of bipolar disorder and schizophrenia, diseases that present oxidative stress in their physiopathology. It has low aqueous solubility, which may lead to low oral bioavailability. The search of new drug delivery systems (DDSs) that may increase dissolution rate of OLZ, associated with the investigation of the antioxidant potential of the loaded-systems become of major importance to understand improvement in bipolar disorder and schizophrenia therapy. Thus, this study aimed to evaluate the in vitro antioxidant potential of two different Layered Double Hydroxides (LDH) loaded with 5% of OLZ (CaAl and NiAl), by radical scavenging activity (2,2-Diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl and nitric oxid); radical cation scavenging activity (2,2'-azino-bis3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid ABTS) and evaluation of inhibition capacity of lipid peroxidation by thiobarbituric acid (TBARS). The results showed that both obtained LDH systems presented in vitro antioxidant capacity when associated with OLZ in all methods performed, and this activity is more pronounced with the systems containing OLZ compared to pure drug. The systems with CaAl was shown to have increased antioxidant potential, compared to NiAl, increasing the antioxidant activity up to 40,83%, 15,84% and 16,73%, as showed by the DPPH, nitric oxide and TBARS tests, respectively. The results revealed that the use of LDHs as a functional excipient may be promising in the pharmaceutical industry for bipolar disorder and schizophrenia therapy.

KEYWORDS:

Bipolar disorder; Drug Delivery Systems; Free radical; Inorganic systems; Schizophrenia treatment

PMID:
29778806
DOI:
10.1016/j.lfs.2018.05.031
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Icon for Elsevier Science
11.
Presse Med. 2018 Jun;47(6):575-585. doi: 10.1016/j.lpm.2018.01.005.

[Psychiatric comorbidities of Alcohol dependence].

[Article in French]

Author information

1
CHU Sud, service de psychiatrie et d'addictologie de liaison, 80054 Amiens cedex, France. Electronic address: Dervaux.Alain@chu-amiens.fr.
2
Centre hospitalier Sainte-Anne, université Paris 5, Descartes, service d'addictologie, 1, rue Cabanis, 75014 Paris, France.

Abstract

Psychiatric disorders are common among patients with alcohol dependence. Symptoms of alcohol intoxication or withdrawal need to be disentangled from symptoms of psychiatric disorders. Alcohol dependence could induce psychiatric disorders, in particular depressive disorders and anxiety disorders. Patients with psychiatric disorders may self-medicate with alcohol use. There may be common factors promoting both alcohol dependence and psychiatric disorders: about 40% of patients with alcohol dependence present personality disorders. Alcohol dependence and psychiatric disorders worsen each other. Integrated approaches to treatment for patients presenting with co-occurring alcohol dependence and psychiatric disorders are recommended, including simultaneous treatments of alcohol dependence and treatments of psychiatric disorders.

PMID:
29773276
DOI:
10.1016/j.lpm.2018.01.005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Icon for Elsevier Science
12.
PLoS Comput Biol. 2018 May 14;14(5):e1006105. doi: 10.1371/journal.pcbi.1006105. eCollection 2018 May.

A loop-counting method for covariate-corrected low-rank biclustering of gene-expression and genome-wide association study data.

Author information

1
Mathematics, New York University, New York, New York, United States of America.
2
Center for Computational Biology, Flatiron Institute, New York, New York, United States of America.
3
Psychiatry, University of California, San Diego, California, United States of America.
4
Human Biology, J. Craig Venters Institute, La Jolla, California, United States of America.
5
Genetics and Genomic Sciences, Mount Sinai Medical School, New York, New York, United States of America.
6
Computer Science, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey, United States of America.
7
Computational Mathematics Science and Engineering, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, United States of America.
8
Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, New York University Medical School, New York, New York, United States of America.
9
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
10
Physiology and Biophysics, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.

Abstract

A common goal in data-analysis is to sift through a large data-matrix and detect any significant submatrices (i.e., biclusters) that have a low numerical rank. We present a simple algorithm for tackling this biclustering problem. Our algorithm accumulates information about 2-by-2 submatrices (i.e., 'loops') within the data-matrix, and focuses on rows and columns of the data-matrix that participate in an abundance of low-rank loops. We demonstrate, through analysis and numerical-experiments, that this loop-counting method performs well in a variety of scenarios, outperforming simple spectral methods in many situations of interest. Another important feature of our method is that it can easily be modified to account for aspects of experimental design which commonly arise in practice. For example, our algorithm can be modified to correct for controls, categorical- and continuous-covariates, as well as sparsity within the data. We demonstrate these practical features with two examples; the first drawn from gene-expression analysis and the second drawn from a much larger genome-wide-association-study (GWAS).

PMID:
29758032
PMCID:
PMC5997363
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pcbi.1006105
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
Icon for Public Library of Science Icon for PubMed Central

Conflict of interest statement

I have read the journal’s policy and the authors of this manuscript have the following competing interests: 1. John I Nurnberger Jr, who is one of the members of the Bipolar Disorders Working Group of the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium, is also an investigator for Assurex and a consultant for Janssen. 2. The remaining authors have no conflicts of interest to declare.

13.
Rev Colomb Psiquiatr. 2018 Apr - Jun;47(2):119-128. doi: 10.1016/j.rcp.2017.01.004. Epub 2017 Feb 22.

Inflammatory Markers in the Staging of Bipolar Disorder: A Systematic Review of the Literature.

[Article in English, Spanish]

Author information

1
Grupo de Investigación en Salud Mental y Comportamiento Humano, Departamento de Psiquiatría, Universidad de Caldas, Manizales, Caldas, Colombia.
2
Grupo de Investigacion en Infección e Inmunidad, Facultad de Ciencias de la Salud, Universidad Tecnológica de Pereira, Pereira, Risaralda, Colombia.
3
Grupo de Investigación en Psiquiatría GIPSI, Departamento de Psiquiatría, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Antioquia, Medellín, Colombia.
4
Grupo de Investigación en Psiquiatría GIPSI, Departamento de Psiquiatría, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Antioquia, Medellín, Colombia. Electronic address: carloslopezjaramillo@gmail.com.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Previous studies suggest that inflammatory molecules play an important role in the pathophysiology of Bipolar Disorder (BD). The evidence suggests that BD may present a progressive course. Therefore there are theories that postulate the relationship between progression and stages of the disease with distinct peripheral biomarkers.

OBJECTIVE:

The aim of this study was to carry out a systematic review of the literature of studies about the association between peripheral inflammatory markers and clinical variables related with staging in BD patients.

METHODS:

We conducted a systematic review using electronic databases: PubMed, SciELO, LiLACS and PsycINFO. Keywords were divided into inflammatory markers and, BD and staging. Studies involving euthymic BD patients, studies evaluating peripheral biomarkers and studies correlating these with clinical variables related to neuroprogression or stage of BD were included.

RESULTS:

We present and discuss the methods and findings of ten articles. The inflammatory markers were measured with different techniques and show some contradictories results. The TNF superfamily and inflammatory cytokines may have a relationship with the neuroprogression of the disease.

CONCLUSIONS:

This study suggests that TNF and ILs could play a role in neuroprogression. However, longitudinal studies are needed to clarify the relationship between factors associated with neuroprogression.

KEYWORDS:

Biomarcadores inflamatorios; Bipolar disorders; Estadificación de la enfermedad; Inflammatory biomarkers; Revisión sistemática; Staging illness; Systematic review; Trastorno bipolar

PMID:
29754705
DOI:
10.1016/j.rcp.2017.01.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Icon for Elsevier Science
14.
Turk Psikiyatri Derg. 2018 Spring;29(1):69-72.

Evaluation of the Decision-making Capacity of Two Cases Planning to Undergo Uterine Evacuation.

Abstract

Psychiatric disorders in the perinatal period can lead to a deterioration in one's judgment and decision-making ability. These disorders may cause sensitive and complex legal and ethical issues relating to psychiatric, obstetric, and neonatal care. Clinicians should ethically respect the autonomy of the individual, but at the same time, they must assess the individual's decision-making process with the use of forensic psychiatric and consultation-liaison psychiatric practice. While the literature related to mental disorders in pregnancy has been increasing, there is limited information regarding the medico-legal and ethical aspects of this topic. Herein, we present two cases who are pregnant and have psychiatric disorders, and we aim to discuss their evaluation process of uterine evacuation.

PMID:
29730877
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text
Icon for Turkish Journal of Psychiatry
15.
Turk Psikiyatri Derg. 2018 Spring;29(1):67-68.

QTc Prolongation and Ventricular Trigemini with Asenapine: A Case Report.

Abstract

Asenapine is one of the newer atypical antipsychotics on the market. It is a sublingually administered drug that is indicated for the treatment of both schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, and is considered to be safe and well tolerated. Herein, we report a 71-year-old female with a history of bipolar disorder who had ventricular trigemini and experienced a large increase in her QTc interval after starting treatment with asenapine. These changes ceased following withdrawal of asenapine. In this case report, we discuss the importance of cardiac monitoring when switching antipsychotics, even to those that are considered to have low cardiac risk.

PMID:
29730876
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text
Icon for Turkish Journal of Psychiatry
16.
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2018 Sep;27(9):1095-1104. doi: 10.1007/s00787-018-1149-5. Epub 2018 May 5.

Comparing the DSM-5 construct of Disruptive Mood Dysregulation Disorder and ICD-10 Mixed Disorder of Emotion and Conduct in the UK Longitudinal Assessment of Manic Symptoms (UK-LAMS) Study.

Author information

1
Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, King's College London, London, UK.
2
South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK.
3
Centre for Interventional Paediatric Psychopharmacology and Rare Diseases (CIPPRD) Research Team, South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, 4 Windsor Walk, Denmark Hill, London, SE5 8BB, UK.
4
Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, King's College London, London, UK. paramala.1.santosh@kcl.ac.uk.
5
Centre for Interventional Paediatric Psychopharmacology and Rare Diseases (CIPPRD) Research Team, South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, 4 Windsor Walk, Denmark Hill, London, SE5 8BB, UK. paramala.1.santosh@kcl.ac.uk.

Abstract

It is important to understand new diagnostic entities in classifications of psychopathology such as the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-5 (DSM-5) (code F34.8) construct of Disruptive Mood Dysregulation Disorder (DMDD) and to compare it with possible equivalent disorders in other classificatory systems such as the International Classification of Diseases-10 (ICD-10), which has a category that superficially appears similar, that is, Mixed Disorder of Emotion and Conduct (MDEC) (code F92). In this study, the United Kingdom (UK) arm (UK-LAMS) of the US National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) supported Longitudinal Assessment of Manic Symptoms (LAMS) multi-site study was used to evaluate and retrospectively construct DMDD and MDEC diagnoses in order to compare them and understand the conditions they co-occur with, in order to improve the clinical understanding. In particular, the phenomenology of UK-LAMS participants (n = 117) was used to determine whether DMDD is a unique entity within the DSM-5. The findings showed that 24 of 68 participants with either DMDD or MDEC (35.3%) fulfilled both diagnostic criteria for DMDD and MDEC, suggesting that these entities do contain overlapping features, particularly symptoms relating to Oppositional Defiant Disorder (ODD)/Conduct Disorder (CD), Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)/Hyperkinetic Disorder (HKD) and/or an anxiety disorder. The data also showed that most of the participants who met DMDD criteria also fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for ODD/CD, ADHD, followed by an anxiety disorder. In this context, this raises the issue whether DMDD is a unique construct or whether the symptomology for DMDD can be better explained as a specifier for ODD/CD and ADHD. Unlike DMDD, MDEC clearly specifies that the label should only be used if emotional and conduct disorders co-exist.

KEYWORDS:

DSM-5; Disruptive Mood Dysregulation Disorder; ICD-10; LAMS; Longitudinal Assessment of Manic Symptoms; Mixed Disorder of Emotion and Conduct

PMID:
29730721
PMCID:
PMC6133106
DOI:
10.1007/s00787-018-1149-5
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
Icon for Springer Icon for PubMed Central
18.
Psychiatr Pol. 2018 Feb 28;52(1):21-32. doi: 10.12740/PP/78974. Epub 2018 Feb 28.

Are suicide risk factors gender specific?

[Article in English, Polish]

Author information

1
Zakład Genetyki w Psychiatrii, Katedra Psychiatrii, Uniwersytet Medyczny im. Karola Marcinkowskiego w Poznaniu.
2
Katedra Informatyki i Statystyki, Uniwersytet Medyczny im. Karola Marcinkowskiego w Poznaniu.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

Suicide is an important clinical problem in psychiatric patients. The highest risk of suicide attempts is noted in affective disorders. In this study we tested 20 factors described in the literature (sociodemographic and clinical factors as well as family burden) in association with suicidal behavior and we analyzed whether the significance of those factors differs between males and females.

METHODS:

In the study we included patients with major depressive disorder (MDD; n = 249) and bipolar affective disorder (BP; n = 582). The Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I (SCID I), the Operational Criteria Diagnostic Checklist (OPCRIT) and a questionnaire of family history were used.

RESULTS:

In the study population we observed an association between suicidal attempts and the following factors: family history of psychiatric disorders, affective disorders and psychoactive substance abuse/dependence; family history of attempted/completed suicide; occurrence of specific symptoms in the course of depressive episode (inappropriate guilt, sense of worthlessness, early morning awakening); and psychotic symptoms. Having children was also associated with suicide attempts. The risk factors of suicide attempt differ between males and females. The age of onset of MDD and coexistence of substance abuse/dependence with affective disorder were significant for lifetime risk of attempted suicide only in female group. Having children was associated with suicide attempts in the whole group and in the male subgroup, but not in the female subgroup.

CONCLUSIONS:

Suicide attempts are significantly associated with 10 out of 20 analyzed clinical factors in our group of affective patients, however, the significance (or lack of it) of these factors differed in female and male groups in half the cases.

KEYWORDS:

gender; risk factors; suicide attempt

PMID:
29704411
DOI:
10.12740/PP/78974
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text
Icon for Polish Psychiatric Association
19.
Gene. 2018 Jul 20;664:119-126. doi: 10.1016/j.gene.2018.04.061. Epub 2018 Apr 22.

Association of CACNA1C with bipolar disorder among the Pakistani population.

Author information

1
Department of Biochemistry, PMAS Arid Agriculture University Rawalpindi, Pakistan; Department of Genetics, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06510, USA.
2
Department of Genetics, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06510, USA.
3
Department of Chronic Disease Epidemiology, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CT 06510, USA.
4
Department of Neuroscience, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06510, USA.
5
Department of Biochemistry, PMAS Arid Agriculture University Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
6
Pakistan Institute of Medical Sciences, Islamabad, Pakistan.
7
Department of Chronic Disease Epidemiology, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CT 06510, USA. Electronic address: andrew.dewan@yale.edu.
8
Department of Biochemistry, PMAS Arid Agriculture University Rawalpindi, Pakistan. Electronic address: Ghazala@uaar.edu.pk.
9
Department of Genetics, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06510, USA; Department of Neuroscience, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06510, USA; Program in Cellular Neuroscience, Neurodegeneration and Repair, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06510, USA. Electronic address: janghoo.lim@yale.edu.

Abstract

Many single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been identified for Bipolar disorder (BD), but association between SNPs and BD can vary depending on the population tested. SNPs rs10994336 and rs9804190 in ANK3 and rs1006737 in CACNA1C have emerged as the most highly replicated SNPs significantly associated with BD. The aim of the present study was to assess the association of these SNPs with BD in the Pakistani population, which has never before been examined. A total of 120 BD and 120 control individuals from Pakistan were examined in this analysis. Genotyping results indicated that rs1006737 in CACNA1C was significantly associated with BD, while rs10994336 or rs9804190 in ANK3 was not significant when examined individually. However, risk score assessment found that the presence of two or more risk alleles was significantly associated with disease, indicating that risk alleles from ANK3 and CACNA1C may additively contribute to BD. A protein-protein interaction network was generated using STRING to probe the relationship between ANK3 and CACNA1C interactors and their associations with BD. While none of the interactors are directly linked to BD, they play a role in pathways linked to BD, including oxytocin and dopamine signaling pathways. Collectively, these results reveal a significant association of CACNA1C with BD among the Pakistani population, extending results from other ethnic groups to the Pakistani population for the first time.

KEYWORDS:

ANK3; Bipolar disorder; CACNA1C; Pakistan

PMID:
29684488
PMCID:
PMC5970093
[Available on 2019-07-20]
DOI:
10.1016/j.gene.2018.04.061
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Icon for Elsevier Science
20.
Chin Med J (Engl). 2018 Apr 20;131(8):912-919. doi: 10.4103/0366-6999.229898.

Association between Perceived Stressfulness of Stressful Life Events and the Suicidal Risk in Chinese Patients with Major Depressive Disorder.

Author information

1
Clinical Psychopharmacology Division, Peking University Sixth Hospital, National Clinical Research Center for Mental Disorders and Key Laboratory of Mental Health, Ministry of Health (Peking University), Beijing 100191, China.
2
National Engineering Research Center for Software Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871, China.

Abstract

Background:

Patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) usually have high risk of suicidality. Few studies have investigated the effects of stressful life events (SLEs) on the risk of suicide in Chinese patients who have developed MDD. This study aimed to investigate the impact of SLEs on suicidal risk in Chinese patients with MDD.

Methods:

In total, 1029 patients with MDD were included from nine psychiatric hospitals to evaluate the impact of SLEs on suicidal risk. Patients fulfilling the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI) criteria for MDD were included in the study. Patients were excluded if they had lifetime or current diagnoses of psychotic disorder, bipolar disorder, and alcohol or substance dependence. Depressive symptoms were assessed by the 17-item Hamilton Depression Scale (HAMD-17). The suicidal risk of MDD patients was determined by the suicide risk module of MINI. SLEs were assessed by the Life Events Scale.

Results:

No gender difference was found for suicidal risk in MDD patients. Patients with suicidal risk had younger ages, lower education levels, more drinking behavior, and lower marriage rate, and fewer people had child and more severe depressive symptoms than nonsuicidal risk group. High-level perceived stressfulness (HPS) and number of SLEs that patients were exposed to were significantly greater in patients with suicidal risk than patients without. In multivariate logistic analysis, HPS of SLEs (odds ratio [OR] = 1.54, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.16-2.05, P = 0.003) and depressive symptoms (OR = 1.08, 95% CI: 1.05-1.11, P < 0.001) were associated with suicidal risk even after adjustment of gender, age, marriage, drinking behavior, and childless.

Conclusions:

HPS of SLEs is associated with suicide risk in Chinese patients with MDD. Further suicide prevention programs targeting this risk factor are needed.

Trial Registration:

ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02023567; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02023567?term=NCT02023567&rank=1.

KEYWORDS:

Life Stresses; Major Depressive Disorder; Suicide

PMID:
29664050
PMCID:
PMC5912056
DOI:
10.4103/0366-6999.229898
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
Icon for Medknow Publications and Media Pvt Ltd Icon for PubMed Central

Supplemental Content

Loading ...
Support Center