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Sleep. 2019 Jan 12. doi: 10.1093/sleep/zsz002. [Epub ahead of print]

Employment Status and the Association of Sociocultural Stress Severity and Stress Burden with Sleep in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL).

Author information

1
School of Social Work, Columbia University, New York, NY.
2
Department of Psychology, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA.
3
Department of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA.
4
Cambridge Health Alliance, Harvard Medical School, Cambridge, MA.
5
Department of Neurology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL.
6
Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY.
7
Department of Biostatistics, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill- Gillins School of Global Public Health, Chapel Hill, NC.
8
Department of Neurology, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL.
9
College of Nursing and health Innovation, Arizona State University, Phoenix, AZ.
10
Department of Psychology, University of Oregon, Eugene, OR.
11
Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA.
12
Department of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA.

Abstract

Study Objectives:

We examined the association of sociocultural stress severity (i.e., acculturation stress, ethnic discrimination) and chronic stress burden with multiple dimensions of sleep in a population-based sample of US Hispanics/Latinos. We also explored whether employment status modified stress-sleep associations.

Methods:

We conducted survey linear regressions to test the cross-sectional association of sociocultural stress severity and stress burden with sleep dimensions using data collected between 2010-2013 from individuals who participated in both the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos Sueño and Sociocultural Ancillary studies (N=1192).

Results:

Greater acculturation stress (B=0.75, SE=0.26, p <.01) and chronic psychosocial stress burden (B=1.04, SE= 0.18, p<.001) were associated with greater insomnia symptoms but were not associated with actigraphic measures of sleep. Ethnic discrimination was not associated with any of the sleep dimensions. The association of acculturation stress with insomnia severity was greater in unemployed (B=2.06, SE= 0.34) compared to employed (B=1.01, SE= 0.31) participants (p-interaction = 0.08).

Conclusion:

Acculturation stress severity and chronic stress burden are important and consistent correlates of insomnia, but not actigraphically-measured sleep dimensions. If replicated, future research should test whether interventions targeting the resolution of sociocultural stress improve sleep quality in Hispanics/Latinos.

PMID:
30649533
DOI:
10.1093/sleep/zsz002

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