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Sci Rep. 2018 Sep 20;8(1):14101. doi: 10.1038/s41598-018-32314-4.

Separation of blood microsamples by exploiting sedimentation at the microscale.

Author information

1
Microsystems Laboratory (LMIS4), School of Engineering (STI), École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Lausanne, CH, 1015, Switzerland. david.forchelet@epfl.ch.
2
ARC Training Centre in Biodevices, Faculty of Science, Engineering and Technology, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, VIC, 3122, Australia.
3
Department of Biology, Institute of Molecular Systems Biology, ETH Zurich, Zurich, CH, 8093, Switzerland.
4
Unit of Toxicology, CURML, Lausanne University Hospital, Geneva University Hospitals, rue Michel-Servet 1, Geneva, CH, 1211, Switzerland.
5
Service of Therapeutic Education for Chronic Diseases, WHO Collaborating Centre, Geneva University Hospitals, University of Geneva, rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil 4, Geneva, CH, 1205, Switzerland.
6
Division of Laboratory Medicine, Department of Genetics and Laboratory Medicine, Geneva University Hospitals, rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil 4, Geneva, CH, 1205, Switzerland.
7
Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes, Hypertension and Nutrition, Department of Internal Medicine Specialities, Faculty of Medicine, University of Geneva, rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil 4, Geneva, CH, 1205, Switzerland.
8
Department of Pharmacology, Cancer Biology Institute, Yale University School of Medicine, West Haven, CT, 06516, USA.
9
Centre for Micro-Photonics, Faculty of Science, Engineering and Technology, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, VIC, 3122, Australia.
10
Faculty of Science, University of Zurich, Zurich, CH, 8006, Switzerland.
11
Faculty of Biology and Medicine, University of Lausanne, Vulliette 04, Lausanne, CH, 1000, Switzerland.
12
Microsystems Laboratory (LMIS4), School of Engineering (STI), École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Lausanne, CH, 1015, Switzerland.

Abstract

Microsample analysis is highly beneficial in blood-based testing where cutting-edge bioanalytical technologies enable the analysis of volumes down to a few tens of microliters. Despite the availability of analytical methods, the difficulty in obtaining high-quality and standardized microsamples at the point of collection remains a major limitation of the process. Here, we detail and model a blood separation principle which exploits discrete viscosity differences caused by blood particle sedimentation in a laminar flow. Based on this phenomenon, we developed a portable capillary-driven microfluidic device that separates blood microsamples collected from finger-pricks and delivers 2 µL of metered serum for bench-top analysis. Flow cytometric analysis demonstrated the high purity of generated microsamples. Proteomic and metabolomic analyses of the microsamples of 283 proteins and 1351 metabolite features was consistent with samples generated via a conventional centrifugation method. These results were confirmed by a clinical study scrutinising 8 blood markers in obese patients.

PMID:
30237536
PMCID:
PMC6147834
DOI:
10.1038/s41598-018-32314-4
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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