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Neuroimage. 2019 Jan 1;184:335-348. doi: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2018.09.042. Epub 2018 Sep 17.

Distinct modes of functional connectivity induced by movie-watching.

Author information

1
N3 Division, Department of Psychiatry, Yale University, 40 Temple Street, New Haven, 06511, Connecticut, USA; Center for Brain and Cognition, Computational Neuroscience Group, Department of Information and Communication Technologies, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Roc Boronat 138, Barcelona, 08018, Spain. Electronic address: murat.demirtas@yale.edu.
2
Center for Brain and Cognition, Computational Neuroscience Group, Department of Information and Communication Technologies, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Roc Boronat 138, Barcelona, 08018, Spain.
3
Department of Radiology, Lausanne University Hospital and University of Lausanne (CHUV-UNIL), Rue du Bugnon 46, 1011 Lausanne, Switzerland.
4
Research Center for Motor Control and Neuroplasticity, KU Leuven, Tervuursevest 101, 3001, Leuven, Belgium; Functional Neuroimaging Laboratory, IRCCS San Camillo Hospital Foundation, via Alberoni 70, 30126, Venice Lido, Italy.
5
Department of Psychology, Sapienza University of Rome, via dei Marsi 78, 00185, Rome, Italy; Fondazione Santa Lucia and Istituto Di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico, 00142, Rome, Italy.
6
Institute for Advanced Biomedical Technologies, "G. d'Annunzio" University of Chieti-Pescara, 66100, Chieti, Italy.
7
Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging, Institute of Neurology, University College London, 12 Queen Square, London, WC1N 3BG, United Kingdom.
8
Department of Neuroscience and Padova Neuroscience Center (PNC), University of Padova, Italy; Departments of Neurology, Radiology, Anatomy of Neurobiology, School of Medicine, Washington University, St. Louis, St Louis, USA.
9
Center for Brain and Cognition, Computational Neuroscience Group, Department of Information and Communication Technologies, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Roc Boronat 138, Barcelona, 08018, Spain; Institució Catalana de la Recerca i Estudis Avançats (ICREA), Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Passeig Lluís Companys 23, Barcelona, 08010, Spain; Department of Neuropsychology, Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, 04103 Leipzig, Germany; School of Psychological Sciences, Monash University, Melbourne, Clayton VIC 3800, Australia.

Abstract

A fundamental question in systems neuroscience is how endogenous neuronal activity self-organizes during particular brain states. Recent neuroimaging studies have demonstrated systematic relationships between resting-state and task-induced functional connectivity (FC). In particular, continuous task studies, such as movie watching, speak to alterations in coupling among cortical regions and enhanced fluctuations in FC compared to the resting-state. This suggests that FC may reflect systematic and large-scale reorganization of functionally integrated responses while subjects are watching movies. In this study, we characterized fluctuations in FC during resting-state and movie-watching conditions. We found that the FC patterns induced systematically by movie-watching can be explained with a single principal component. These condition-specific FC fluctuations overlapped with inter-subject synchronization patterns in occipital and temporal brain regions. However, unlike inter-subject synchronization, condition-specific FC patterns were characterized by increased correlations within frontal brain regions and reduced correlations between frontal-parietal brain regions. We investigated these condition-specific functional variations as a shorter time scale, using time-resolved FC. The time-resolved FC showed condition-specificity over time; notably when subjects watched both the same and different movies. To explain self-organisation of global FC through the alterations in local dynamics, we used a large-scale computational model. We found that condition-specific reorganization of FC could be explained by local changes that engendered changes in FC among higher-order association regions, mainly in frontal and parietal cortices.

PMID:
30237036
PMCID:
PMC6248881
[Available on 2020-01-01]
DOI:
10.1016/j.neuroimage.2018.09.042

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