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Science. 2014 May 16;344(6185):738-42. doi: 10.1126/science.1252136. Epub 2014 May 15.

Stick insect genomes reveal natural selection's role in parallel speciation.

Author information

1
Department of Animal and Plant Sciences, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S10 2TN, UK.
2
Department of Biology, Utah State University, Logan, UT 84322, USA.
3
Deparment of Biology, University of Nevada, Reno, NV 89557, USA.
4
Department of Entomology, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843, USA.
5
Department of Botany, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY 82071, USA.
6
Department of Biology, Notre Dame University, South Bend, IN 46556, USA.
7
J. F. Blumenbach Institute of Zoology and Anthropology, University of Göttingen, 37073 Göttingen, Germany.
8
Department of Ecology and Evolution, University of Lausanne, Lausanne CH-1015, Switzerland.
9
Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Rice University, Houston, TX 77005, USA.
10
Department of Biological Sciences, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC V5A 1S6, Canada.
11
Department of Animal and Plant Sciences, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S10 2TN, UK. p.nosil@sheffield.ac.uk.

Abstract

Natural selection can drive the repeated evolution of reproductive isolation, but the genomic basis of parallel speciation remains poorly understood. We analyzed whole-genome divergence between replicate pairs of stick insect populations that are adapted to different host plants and undergoing parallel speciation. We found thousands of modest-sized genomic regions of accentuated divergence between populations, most of which are unique to individual population pairs. We also detected parallel genomic divergence across population pairs involving an excess of coding genes with specific molecular functions. Regions of parallel genomic divergence in nature exhibited exceptional allele frequency changes between hosts in a field transplant experiment. The results advance understanding of biological diversification by providing convergent observational and experimental evidence for selection's role in driving repeatable genomic divergence.

PMID:
24833390
DOI:
10.1126/science.1252136
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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