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Blood Press Monit. 1996 Jun;1(3):289-291.

Analysis of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring: the problem of 'white-coat' hypertension, responders and non-responders.

Author information

1
Hypertension Division, University Hospital, Lausanne, Switzerland.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To analyse a randomized study undertaken to compare the antihypertensive efficacy of dihydropyridine calcium antagonists in patients with essential hypertension.

METHOD:

Blood pressure was measured both conventionally by a doctor and by non-invasive ambulatory monitoring.

RESULTS:

During amlodipine therapy (5 mg once a day for 4 weeks, n = 121), the mean daytime diastolic blood pressure was lowered by 8.2+/-7.1 and 0.9+/-7.4 mmHg (means +/- SD) in patients with a pretreatment daytime diastolic blood pressure >/= 90 (n = 89) and < 90 mmHg (n = 32), respectively. In 60 (67%) among the 89 patients who had an initial daytime diastolic blood pressure >/= 90 mmHg the daytime diastolic blood pressure was lowered by >/= 5 mmHg, with a mean fall of 12.0+/- 5.2 mmHg. The decrease in daytime diastolic blood pressure averaged 0.6+/- 3.5 mmHg in the remaining non-responder patients (n = 29).

CONCLUSION:

It seems important to evaluate the efficacy of a given antihypertensive drug by analysing patients with white-coat hypertension separately from responders to the medication. This allows one to gain maximum information concerning the effect of therapy in the individual hypertensive patients.

PMID:
10226246

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