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Environ Health Perspect. 2018 Apr 12;126(4):047005. doi: 10.1289/EHP2738.

Maternal Smoking during Pregnancy and Early Childhood and Development of Asthma and Rhinoconjunctivitis - a MeDALL Project.

Author information

1
Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
2
Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences (IRAS), Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
3
Institute of Epidemiology, Helmholtz Zentrum München - German Research Centre for Environmental Health, Neuherberg, Germany.
4
Centre for Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Stockholm County Council, Stockholm, Sweden
5
Department of Pediatrics, Technical University of Munich, Munich, Germany.
6
Research Institute, Department of Paediatrics, Marien-Hospital-Wesel, Wesel, Germany.
7
Institute for Social Medicine, Epidemiology and Health Economics, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany
8
Dr. von Hauner Children's Hospital, Medical Center of Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Munich, Germany.
9
Department of Paediatric Pulmonology and Paediatric Allergology, Beatrix Children’s Hospital, University Medical Centre Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands
10
Groningen Research Institute for Asthma and COPD (GRIAC), University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands
11
Sachs’ Children and Youth Hospital, Södersjukhuset, Stockholm, Sweden
12
Department of Clinical Science and Education, Södersjukhuset, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden
13
Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pneumology and Immunology, Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany
14
Department of Environmental Immunology and Core Facility Studies, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research – UFZ, Leipzig, Germany
15
Biomax Informatics AG, Munich, Germany
16
IUF – Leibniz Research Institute for Environmental Medicine, Düsseldorf, Germany
17
Centre for Nutrition, Prevention and Health Services, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, Bilthoven, Netherlands
18
Institute and Outpatient Clinic for Occupational, Social and Environmental Medicine, Inner City Clinic, University Hospital of Munich (LMU), Munich, Germany
19
MACVIA-France, Contre les Maladies Chroniques pour un Vieillissement Actif en France European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing Reference Site, Montpellier, France
20
INSERM U 1168, VIMA: Ageing and chronic diseases Epidemiological and public health approaches, Villejuif, Université Versailles St-Quentin-en-Yvelines, UMR-S 1168, Montigny le Bretonneux, France
21
ISGlobal, Centre for Research in Environmental Epidemiology (CREAL), Barcelona, Spain
22
Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute (IMIM), Barcelona, Spain
23
CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain
24
Universitat Pompeu Fabra (UPF), Barcelona, Spain
25
Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Centre Utrecht, Utrecht, Netherlands

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The role of tobacco smoke exposure in the development and persistence of asthma and rhinoconjunctivitis through childhood into adolescence is unclear.

OBJECTIVES:

We assessed the associations of parental smoking from fetal life through adolescence with asthma and rhinoconjunctivitis during childhood and adolescence.

METHODS:

We analyzed data for 10,860 participants of five European birth cohort studies from the Mechanisms of the Development of Allergy (MeDALL) consortium. Parental smoking habits and health outcomes (early transient, persistent, and adolescent-onset asthma and rhinoconjunctivitis) were based on questionnaires covering the period from pregnancy to 14-16 y of age. Data were combined and analyzed using a one-stage and two-stage individual participant data meta-analysis.

RESULTS:

Overall, any maternal smoking during pregnancy tended to be associated with an increased odds of prevalent asthma [adjusted odds ratio (aOR)=1.19 (95% CI: 0.98, 1.43)], but not prevalent rhinoconjunctivitis [aOR=1.05 (95% CI: 0.90, 1.22)], during childhood and adolescence. In analyses with phenotypes related to age of onset and persistence of disease, any maternal smoking during pregnancy was associated with early transient asthma [aOR=1.79 (95% CI: 1.14, 2.83)]. Maternal smoking of ≥10 cigarettes/day during pregnancy was associated with persistent asthma [aOR=1.66 (95% CI: 1.29, 2.15)] and persistent rhinoconjunctivitis [aOR=1.55 (95% CI, 1.09, 2.20)]. Tobacco smoke exposure during fetal life, infancy, childhood, and adolescence was not associated with adolescent-onset asthma or rhinoconjunctivitis.

CONCLUSIONS:

Findings from this combined analysis of five European birth cohorts strengthen evidence linking early exposure to tobacco smoke with asthma during childhood and adolescence. Children with high early-life exposure were more likely than unexposed children to have early transient and persistent asthma and persistent rhinoconjunctivitis. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP2738.

PMID:
29664587
PMCID:
PMC6071724
DOI:
10.1289/EHP2738
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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