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Curr Osteoporos Rep. 2018 Apr;16(2):155-168. doi: 10.1007/s11914-018-0432-1.

Clinical and Research Approaches to Treat Non-union Fracture.

Author information

1
Julius Wolff Institut and Center for Musculoskeletal Surgery, Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Augustenburger Platz 1, 13353, Berlin, Germany.
2
Berlin-Brandenburg Center for Regenerative Therapies, Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany.
3
Julius Wolff Institut and Center for Musculoskeletal Surgery, Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Augustenburger Platz 1, 13353, Berlin, Germany. georg.duda@charite.de.
4
Berlin-Brandenburg Center for Regenerative Therapies, Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany. georg.duda@charite.de.

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW:

Impaired healing outcomes or even non-unions after bone injury are still a highly relevant problem in the daily clinical life. Especially within an aging population, the occurrence of bone fractures increases and thus novel treatment approaches to overcome compromised bone regeneration are needed.

RECENT FINDINGS:

The gold standard to treat delayed or non-healing bone injuries is still the use of autologous bone grafts to foster regeneration. Besides its successful treatment outcome, it also has disadvantages: a second surgery is needed in order to harvest the bone material and the material is highly limited. Looking into the recent literature, a multitude of different research approaches were already conducted to identify new possible strategies to treat impaired bone regeneration: application of mesenchymal stromal cells, platelet lysates, growth factors, interference in the immune system, or bone formation stimulation by ultrasound. This review gives an overview of the treatment approaches actually performed in the clinic as well as at the bench in the context of compromised bone healing. It clearly highlights the complexity of the nature of non-healing bone fractures as well as patient-dependent factors influencing the healing process.

KEYWORDS:

Autologous bone graft; Bone fracture healing; Cell therapy; Compromised healing; Immune therapy; Non-union

PMID:
29536393
DOI:
10.1007/s11914-018-0432-1
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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