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Dtsch Med Wochenschr. 2013 Aug;138(34-35):1711-6. doi: 10.1055/s-0033-1349437. Epub 2013 Aug 9.

[Deficits in central venous catheter associated bloodstream infection].

[Article in German]

Author information

1
Institut für Hygiene und Umweltmedizin, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin. sonja.hansen@charite.de

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE:

Intensive care units (ICUs) with high rates of central venous catheter (CVC) -associated bloodstream infections (BSI) were invited to implement a bundle on BSI prevention during an educational programme which was created by the German national reference center for surveillance of nosocomial infections (NRZ). Training of health care workers (HCWs) was the main component and will be presented in the following.

METHODS:

The intervention was realized by local infection control staff from April 2006 to March 2007. Modules were lecture, script and poster. Before the intervention HCWs completed an anonymous multiple choice questionnaire about BSI prevention measures. Lectures could be modified in accordance to the ICUs knowledge of prevention measures. Processes and CVC-BSI rates were surveyed and analysed before and after the intervention and also during an additional 24-months follow-up period.

RESULTS:

Thirty-two ICUs with 1,622 HCWs realized the intervention. Knowledge of BSI prevention of 1,251 HCWs was assessed. Knowledge gaps could predominantly be shown for the favored insertion site and the changing intervals of intravenous tubing for aqueous infusions. One third of HCWs said that a daily CVC's dressing change was indicated. After the intervention ICUs showed a significant decrease in the pooled CVC-BSI rate. ICUs showed a significant decrease of the pooled CVC-BSI rate during the follow-up.

CONCLUSION:

In this first assessment of more than 1,200 HCWs' knowledge of BSI prevention in German ICUs knowledge gaps could be identified. During the 12-months intervention the implementation of evidence based IC recommendations improved and the pooled CVC-BSI rate decreased significantly.

PMID:
23934589
DOI:
10.1055/s-0033-1349437
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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