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Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2007 Apr;28(4):466-72. Epub 2007 Mar 16.

Risk factors for death due to nosocomial infection in intensive care unit patients: findings from the Krankenhaus Infektions Surveillance System.

Author information

1
Institute of Medical Microbiology and Hospital Epidemiology, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany. Gastmeier.Petra@mh-hannover.de

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine risk factors for death among patients with nosocomial pneumonia and patients with primary bloodstream infections (BSI) in intensive care units (ICUs).

DESIGN:

Prospective cohort study.

SETTING:

Data collected from January 1997 through June 2003 from ICUs registered with the Krankenhaus Infektions Surveillance System in Germany.

PATIENTS:

A total of 8,432 patients with nosocomial pneumonia from 202 ICUs and 2,759 patients with nosocomial primary BSI from 190 ICUs.

METHODS:

The following risk factors were considered in the analysis: age, sex, time in the ICU before onset of infection, type of ICU, type and size of hospital, intubation, central venous catheter use, total parenteral nutrition, and type of pathogen.

RESULTS:

A total of 750 patients (8.9%) with nosocomial pneumonia and 302 patients (10.9%) with nosocomial primary BSI died. Multiple logistic regression analysis identified treatment in a medical or surgical ICU (odds ratio [OR], 1.55 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 1.32-1.82]) or a hospital with more than 1,000 beds (OR, 2.14 [95% CI, 1.81-2.56]), age older than 65 years (OR, 1.54 [95% CI, 1.31-1.81]), and infection with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (OR, 2.39 [95% CI, 1.81-3.12]) or multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (OR, 3.00 [95% CI, 1.90-4.63]) as independent determinants of death from nosocomial pneumonia. Age older than the median of 63 years (OR, 1.44 [95% CI, 1.12-1.86]) and methicillin-resistant S. aureus as the causative agent (OR, 2.98 [95% CI, 1.81-5.82]) were both associated with increased mortality from primary BSI. The types of infecting pathogens, particularly those resistant to multiple drugs, were also strong outcome predictors among ICU patients.

CONCLUSIONS:

The study results underline the need for further investigations of the role of antimicrobial resistance in the outcome of patients with nosocomial pneumonia and patients with primary BSI.

PMID:
17385154
DOI:
10.1086/510810
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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