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Diabet Med. 2009 Aug;26(8):815-9. doi: 10.1111/j.1464-5491.2009.02761.x.

Reduced endogenous secretory receptor for advanced glycation end products (esRAGE) in young people with Type 1 diabetes developing microalbuminuria.

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1
Department of Paediatrics and Institute of Metabolic Science, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK.

Abstract

AIMS:

The endogenous secretory receptor for advanced glycation end products (esRAGE) appears to work as a scavenger for AGEs and it has been implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications. The aim of the present study was to perform a longitudinal evaluation of esRAGE in young people with Type 1 diabetes (T1D) in relation to the development of microalbuminuria (MA).

METHODS:

Serum esRAGE levels were measured in longitudinally collected blood samples from 49 T1D patients with MA (MA+) and 49 matched normoalbuminuric patients (MA-), followed in the Oxford Regional Prospective Study. esRAGE levels were compared between MA+ and MA- subjects in relation to the time of MA onset.

RESULTS:

Overall, esRAGE levels were significantly lower in MA+ than in MA- subjects (0.727 +/- 0.396 vs. 0.936 +/- 0.433 ng/ml; P = 0.015). These differences between the two groups were present both before (0.725 +/- 0.410 vs. 0.956 +/- 0.505 ng/ml, P = 0.038) and after the onset of MA (0.750 +/- 0.433 vs. 0.948 +/- 0.418 ng/ml, P = 0.04). In a longitudinal analysis there was no effect of age, duration, glycated haemoglobin (HbA(1c)) or body mass index standard deviation scores on esRAGE levels (all P > 0.05). In a Cox model, esRAGE levels significantly contributed to the probability of developing MA [Exp(B)(95% confidence interval): 0.34(0.12-0.98); P = 0.04), independently of HbA(1c).

CONCLUSIONS:

In this longitudinal study of young people with T1D, esRAGE levels were reduced in MA+ subjects, even before the onset of MA, and appeared to be related to its development, thus suggesting a potential role of esRAGE in the pathogenesis of this complication. Diabet. Med. 26, 815-819 (2009).

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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