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J Diabetes Complications. 2010 Mar-Apr;24(2):73-8. doi: 10.1016/j.jdiacomp.2009.03.002. Epub 2009 Apr 23.

Consequences of delayed pump infusion line change in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus treated with continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion.

Author information

1
Tulane University Health Sciences, New Orleans, LA, USA. tthethi@tulane.edu <tthethi@tulane.edu>

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To systematically investigate the effect of lack of adherence to the recommended change in insulin pump infusion line use beyond 48 h and determine whether the type of insulin made a difference.

RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS:

This was a double-blind, randomized, crossover trial with 20 patients with diabetes mellitus I using insulins aspart and lispro without a line change for up to 100 h. Using retrospective continuous glucose monitoring, we analyzed the average glucose over the day. Changes in serum 1,5-anhydroglucitol, carboxymethyllysine, and free 15-F(2t) isoprostane were also studied.

RESULTS:

From Day 2 to Day 5 of the pump line use, the daily average glucose level increased from 122.7 to 163.9 mg/dl (P<.05), fasting glucose from 120.3 to 154.5 mg/dl (P<.05), postprandial glucose from 114.6 to 172.1 mg/dl (P<.05), and the daily maximum glucose from 207.7 to 242.8 dl (P<.05 for the trend). Time period that the glucose was >180 mg/dl increased from 14.5% to 38.3% (P<.05). Loss of control occurred despite increase in total daily insulin dose from 48.5+/-11.8 to 55.3+/-17.9 U (P=.05). There was no difference in loss of control between insulin types, and biomarkers measured did not change significantly.

CONCLUSIONS:

The insulin pump infusion should be changed every 48 h in patients using continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII), to avoid loss of glycemic control. In the short-term, this loss of glycemic control has no impact on oxidative stress and glycation.

PMID:
19395280
PMCID:
PMC2854665
DOI:
10.1016/j.jdiacomp.2009.03.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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