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Curr Opin Endocrinol Diabetes Obes. 2008 Apr;15(2):118-22. doi: 10.1097/MED.0b013e3282f7960b.

Sensor-augmented pump therapy in type 1 diabetes.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, Center for Clinical Investigation, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut 06520-8064, USA. stuart.weinzimer@yale.edu

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW:

Recent developments in technology have ushered in a new era of managing type 1 diabetes. Continuous glucose monitoring is rapidly becoming an accepted adjunct to traditional self-monitoring of plasma glucose, and the marriage of continuous glucose sensors to continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion is the first step towards the development of a true artificial pancreas. The purpose of this review is to familiarize the reader with the new glucose sensors and discuss the literature evaluating their accuracy and effectiveness.

RECENT FINDINGS:

Current models of continuous glucose sensors are still less accurate than traditional methods of blood glucose monitoring but provide information regarding trends that cannot be obtained with blood testing. Short-term studies of continuous glucose sensors have demonstrated reduction in glycosylated hemoglobin levels and time spent in hypo- and hyperglycemic ranges. Patient acceptance and satisfaction with sensors has been shown to depend on the quality of the data, comfort of wear, and ease of use.

SUMMARY:

Sensor-augmented pump therapy represents a landmark improvement in diabetes treatment and will likely become the standard of care. Future work should focus on improvements in sensor accuracy and development of user-friendly algorithms to assist patients with self-management.

PMID:
18316945
DOI:
10.1097/MED.0b013e3282f7960b
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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