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Infection. 2018 Dec;46(6):837-845. doi: 10.1007/s15010-018-1216-3. Epub 2018 Sep 7.

Comparison of patient characteristics, clinical management, infectious specialist consultation, and outcome in men and women with methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia: a propensity-score adjusted retrospective study.

Author information

1
Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Inflammation Center, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Aurora Hospital, University of Helsinki, Nordenskiöldinkatu 26, Building 3, P.O. Box 348, 00029 HUS, Helsinki, Finland. erik.forsblom@helsinki.fi.
2
Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Inflammation Center, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Aurora Hospital, University of Helsinki, Nordenskiöldinkatu 26, Building 3, P.O. Box 348, 00029 HUS, Helsinki, Finland.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Sex-related treatment inequalities are suggested to explain outcome differences between men and women in Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB). We compared patient characteristics, clinical management, infectious specialist consultation (ISC) and outcome in men and women with SAB.

METHODS:

Multicenter retrospective study of methicillin-sensitive (MS-) SAB patients categorized according to sex and ISC consultation provided within 7 days of diagnosis.

RESULTS:

Altogether 617 SAB patients were included in the analysis: 62% males and 38% females. Male sex was associated less often to nosocomial bacteremia (OR 0.69, 95% CI 0.50-0.96, p = 0.029) and more often to alcoholism (OR 2.25, 95% CI 1.31-3.87, p = 0.003). No sex-related differences were seen in basic or immunologic laboratory tests, illness severity, intensive care unit treatment or thromboembolic events. ISC was provided to most patients (94%) irrespective of sex. No differences were seen in clinical management of men or women: Transthoracic or -esophageal echocardiography (61% vs. 65%), deep infection (77% vs. 72%), infection removal (30% vs. 27%) and anti-staphylococcal antibiotics as first-line treatment (54% vs. 51%). However, male sex was connected to more frequent adjunctive rifampicin treatment (52% vs. 41%, p = 0.025). No difference in 28- or 90-day mortality (13% vs. 13% and 18% vs. 20%) or SAB relapse (0% vs. 1%) was observed between men and women. Propensity-score adjusted Cox proportional analysis gave no connection of sex to mortality within 90 days.

CONCLUSION:

Patient characteristics, clinical management, ISC guidance, bacteremia relapse, and outcome did not differ in men and women with MS-SAB.

KEYWORDS:

Deep infection foci; Infectious specialist consultation; Prognosis; S. aureus bacteremia; Sex

PMID:
30194636
DOI:
10.1007/s15010-018-1216-3
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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