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Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 2016 Sep 23;60(10):6189-92. doi: 10.1128/AAC.01201-16. Print 2016 Oct.

High Prevalence of Carbapenemase-Producing Enterobacteriaceae among Hospitalized Children in Luanda, Angola.

Author information

1
Emerging Antibiotic Resistance Unit, Medical and Molecular Microbiology, Department of Medicine, University of Fribourg, Fribourg, Switzerland INSERM European Unit (LEA, Paris, France), University of Fribourg, Fribourg, Switzerland.
2
Emerging Antibiotic Resistance Unit, Medical and Molecular Microbiology, Department of Medicine, University of Fribourg, Fribourg, Switzerland INSERM European Unit (LEA, Paris, France), University of Fribourg, Fribourg, Switzerland University of Lausanne and University Hospital Center, Lausanne, Switzerland.
3
Escola Superior de Saúde da Cruz Vermelha Portuguesa (ESSCVP), Lisbon, Portugal.
4
Emerging Antibiotic Resistance Unit, Medical and Molecular Microbiology, Department of Medicine, University of Fribourg, Fribourg, Switzerland INSERM European Unit (LEA, Paris, France), University of Fribourg, Fribourg, Switzerland laurent.poirel@unifr.ch.

Abstract

This study aimed to evaluate the prevalence of carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae in Luanda, Angola. A total of 157 rectal samples were collected from children visiting a pediatric hospital in Luanda in March 2015. Fifty-seven imipenem-nonsusceptible enterobacterial isolates were recovered, most of which were non-clonally related. The blaOXA-181 (50/57) and blaNDM-1 (7/57) carbapenemase genes were identified. Notably, OXA-181-producing Escherichia coli isolates rarely coproduced extended-spectrum β-lactamases and consequently remained susceptible to broad-spectrum cephalosporins. The blaOXA-181 gene was always located on an IncX3 plasmid, while the blaNDM-1 gene was located on either IncFIA or IncA/C plasmids. The study identified a high prevalence of OXA-181 among hospitalized children in Angola.

PMID:
27503638
PMCID:
PMC5038229
DOI:
10.1128/AAC.01201-16
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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