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Gastroenterology. 2016 Feb;150(2):355-7.e3. doi: 10.1053/j.gastro.2015.10.048. Epub 2015 Nov 6.

Chronic Infection With Camelid Hepatitis E Virus in a Liver Transplant Recipient Who Regularly Consumes Camel Meat and Milk.

Author information

1
Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore; Department of Medicine, National University Health System, Singapore; National University Centre for Organ Transplantation, National University Hospital, Singapore. Electronic address: mdcleegh@nus.edu.sg.
2
Saw Swee Hock School of Public Health, National University of Singapore, Singapore.
3
Department of Hematology, Singapore General Hospital, Singapore.
4
Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore; Department of Medicine, National University Health System, Singapore; National University Centre for Organ Transplantation, National University Hospital, Singapore.
5
Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore; Department of Pathology, National University Health System, Singapore.
6
Genome Institute of Singapore, Singapore.
7
Genome Institute of Singapore, Singapore; London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, United Kingdom.
8
Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Singapore General Hospital, Singapore; Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School, Singapore.
9
Division of Viral Hepatitis, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia.

Abstract

There have been increasing reports of food-borne zoonotic transmission of hepatitis E virus (HEV) genotype 3, which causes chronic infections in immunosuppressed patients. We performed phylogenetic analyses of the HEV sequence (partial and full-length) from 1 patient from the Middle East who underwent liver transplantation, and compared it with other orthohepevirus A sequences. We found the patient to be infected by camelid HEV. This patient regularly consumed camel meat and milk, therefore camelid HEV, which is genotype 7, might infect human beings. Our finding links consumption of camel-derived food products to post-transplantation hepatitis E, which, if detected at early stages, can be cured with antiviral therapy and reduced administration of immunosuppressive agents.

KEYWORDS:

Case Study; Liver Disease; Viral Infection; Zoonosis

PMID:
26551551
DOI:
10.1053/j.gastro.2015.10.048
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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