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FEMS Microbiol Lett. 2015 Jul;362(13):fnv091. doi: 10.1093/femsle/fnv091. Epub 2015 May 29.

Yersinia pseudotuberculosis IP32953 survives and replicates in trophozoites and persists in cysts of Acanthamoeba castellanii.

Author information

1
Paul G. Allen School for Global Animal Health, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington, WA 99164, USA.
2
Paul G. Allen School for Global Animal Health, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington, WA 99164, USA Departamento Ciencia Animal, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, A. A. 237, Palmira Valle, Colombia.
3
Paul G. Allen School for Global Animal Health, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington, WA 99164, USA viveka@vetmed.wsu.edu.

Abstract

Yersinia pseudotuberculosis is a foodborne enteric pathogen that causes a mild self-limiting diarrhea in humans. Yersinia pseudotuberculosis is able to persist in soil and water and in association with fresh produce, but the mechanism by which it persists is unknown. It has been shown that Y. pseudotuberculosis co-occurs with protozoans in these environments; therefore, this study investigates if bacterivorous free-living amoeba (FLA) are able to support persistence of Y. pseudotuberculosis. Coculture studies of Y. pseudotuberculosis and the prototype FLA, Acanthamoeba castellanii revealed that bacteria had an enhanced capacity to survive in association with amoeba and in the absence of any cytotoxic effects. Yersinia pseudotuberculosis is able to survive and replicate in trophozoites specifically localized within vacuoles, and persists within cysts over a period of at least a week. These data present the first evidence that Y. pseudotuberculosis is able to resist the bacterivorous nature of FLA and instead exhibits an enhanced ability to replicate and persist in coculture with amoeba. This study sheds light on the potential role of FLA in the ecology of Y. pseudotuberculosis which may have implications for food safety.

KEYWORDS:

Acanthamoeba; Yersinia; cyst; trophozoite

PMID:
26025069
PMCID:
PMC4661780
DOI:
10.1093/femsle/fnv091
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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