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JAMA. 2002 Mar 27;287(12):1556-60.

Relationship between prepregnancy anthrax vaccination and pregnancy and birth outcomes among US Army women.

Author information

1
Department of Preventive Medicine, Madigan Army Medical Center, Tacoma, WA 98431, USA. andrew.wiesen@amedd.army.mil

Abstract

CONTEXT:

Substantial concern surrounds the potential health effects of the anthrax vaccine, particularly the potential adverse effects on reproductive processes.

OBJECTIVE:

To determine whether receipt of anthrax vaccination by reproductive-aged women has an effect on pregnancy rates.

DESIGN, SETTING, AND PATIENTS:

Cohort study, based on information from a computer database, of women aged 17 to 44 years who were stationed at Fort Stewart, Ga, or Hunter Army Airfield, Ga, from January 1999 through March 2000.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Pregnancy and birth rates and adverse birth outcomes.

RESULTS:

Of a total of 4092 women, 3136 received at least 1 dose of the anthrax vaccine. There was a total of 513 pregnancies, with 385 following at least 1 dose of anthrax vaccine. The pregnancy rate ratio (before and after adjustment for marital status, race, and age) comparing vaccinated with unvaccinated women was 0.94 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.8-1.2; P =.60). There were 353 live births and 25 pregnancies lost to follow-up. The birth odds ratio after anthrax vaccination (before and after adjustment for marital status and age) was 0.9 (95% CI, 0.5-1.4; P =.55). After adjusting for age, the odds ratio for adverse birth outcome after receiving at least 1 dose of anthrax vaccination was 0.9 (95% CI, 0.4-2.4; P =.88). However, this study did not have sufficient power to detect adverse birth outcomes.

CONCLUSION:

Anthrax vaccination had no effect on pregnancy and birth rates or adverse birth outcomes.

PMID:
11911758
DOI:
10.1001/jama.287.12.1556
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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