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Kidney Int. 2016 Nov;90(5):1071-1079. doi: 10.1016/j.kint.2016.05.028. Epub 2016 Aug 12.

Treatment frequency and mortality among incident hemodialysis patients in the United States comparing incremental with standard and more frequent dialysis.

Author information

1
Division of Nephrology, Northwell Health, Great Neck, New York, USA.
2
Harold Simmons Center for Kidney Disease Research and Epidemiology, Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, University of California Irvine, School of Medicine, Orange, California, USA.
3
Division of Nephrology, VA Long Beach Healthcare System, Long Beach, California, USA.
4
Division of Nephrology, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, Tennessee, USA; Section of Nephrology, Memphis VA Medical Center, Memphis, Tennessee, USA.
5
Kidney Research Institute and Harborview Medical Center, Division of Nephrology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA.
6
Harold Simmons Center for Kidney Disease Research and Epidemiology, Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, University of California Irvine, School of Medicine, Orange, California, USA; Fielding School of Public Health at UCLA, Los Angeles, California, USA; Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute at Harbor-UCLA, Torrance, California, USA. Electronic address: kkz@uci.edu.

Abstract

Most patients with end-stage renal disease in the United States are initiated on thrice-weekly hemodialysis (HD) regimens. However, an incremental approach to HD may provide several patient benefits. We tested whether initiation of incremental HD does or does not compromise survival compared with a conventional HD regimen. The survival of 434 incremental, 50,162 conventional, and 160 frequent HD patients were compared using Cox regression analysis after matching for demographic and comorbid factors in a longitudinal national cohort of adult incident HD patients enrolled between January 2007 and December 2011. Sensitivity analysis included adjustment for residual kidney function. After adjustment for residual kidney function, all-cause mortality was not significantly different in the incremental compared with conventional HD group (hazard ratio 0.88, 95% confidence interval 0.72-1.08), but was higher in the frequent compared with the conventional HD group (hazard ratio, 1.56, 95% confidence interval 1.21-2.03). The comorbidity burden modified the association of treatment frequency and mortality, with higher comorbidity associated with higher mortality in the incremental HD group (hazard ratio, 1.77, 95% confidence interval 1.20-2.62) for a Charlson Comorbidity Index of ≥5. Thus, among incident HD patients with low or moderate comorbid disease, survival was similar for patients initiated on an incremental or conventional HD regimen. Clinical trials are needed to examine the safety and effectiveness of incremental HD and the selected patient populations who may benefit from an incremental approach to HDs initiation.

KEYWORDS:

chronic kidney disease; hemodialysis; incremental; mortality

PMID:
27528548
DOI:
10.1016/j.kint.2016.05.028
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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