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Nat Commun. 2018 Oct 25;9(1):4430. doi: 10.1038/s41467-018-06504-7.

A biomaterial with a channel-like pore architecture induces endochondral healing of bone defects.

Author information

1
Julius Wolff Institute, Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Augustenburger Platz 1, 13353, Berlin, Germany. ansgar.petersen@charite.de.
2
Berlin-Brandenburg Center for Regenerative Therapies, Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Augustenburger Platz 1, 13353, Berlin, Germany. ansgar.petersen@charite.de.
3
Julius Wolff Institute, Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Augustenburger Platz 1, 13353, Berlin, Germany.
4
Matricel GmbH, Kaiserstrasse 100, 52134, Herzogenrath, Germany.
5
Berlin-Brandenburg School for Regenerative Therapies, Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Augustenburger Platz 1, 13353, Berlin, Germany.
6
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Texas Health Science Center San Antonio, 7703 Floyd Curl Dr, 78229, San Antonio, TX, USA.
7
Berlin-Brandenburg Center for Regenerative Therapies, Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Augustenburger Platz 1, 13353, Berlin, Germany.

Abstract

Biomaterials developed to treat bone defects have classically focused on bone healing via direct, intramembranous ossification. In contrast, most bones in our body develop from a cartilage template via a second pathway called endochondral ossification. The unsolved clinical challenge to regenerate large bone defects has brought endochondral ossification into discussion as an alternative approach for bone healing. However, a biomaterial strategy for the regeneration of large bone defects via endochondral ossification is missing. Here we report on a biomaterial with a channel-like pore architecture to control cell recruitment and tissue patterning in the early phase of healing. In consequence of extracellular matrix alignment, CD146+ progenitor cell accumulation and restrained vascularization, a highly organized endochondral ossification process is induced in rats. Our findings demonstrate that a pure biomaterial approach has the potential to recapitulate a developmental bone growth process for bone healing. This might motivate future strategies for biomaterial-based tissue regeneration.

PMID:
30361486
PMCID:
PMC6202397
DOI:
10.1038/s41467-018-06504-7
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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