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Items: 1 to 20 of 95

1.

Transient subcortical functional connectivity upon emergence from propofol sedation in human male volunteers: evidence for active emergence.

Nir T, Or-Borichev A, Izraitel E, Hendler T, Lerner Y, Matot I.

Br J Anaesth. 2019 Jul 2. pii: S0007-0912(19)30442-8. doi: 10.1016/j.bja.2019.05.038. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
31277837
2.

Functional connectivity disturbances of the ascending reticular activating system in temporal lobe epilepsy.

Englot DJ, D'Haese PF, Konrad PE, Jacobs ML, Gore JC, Abou-Khalil BW, Morgan VL.

J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry. 2017 Nov;88(11):925-932. doi: 10.1136/jnnp-2017-315732. Epub 2017 Jun 19.

3.

Multimodal assessment of recovery from coma in a rat model of diffuse brainstem tegmentum injury.

Pais-Roldán P, Edlow BL, Jiang Y, Stelzer J, Zou M, Yu X.

Neuroimage. 2019 Apr 1;189:615-630. doi: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2019.01.060. Epub 2019 Jan 29.

PMID:
30708105
4.

Fine-Grained Parcellation of Brain Connectivity Improves Differentiation of States of Consciousness During Graded Propofol Sedation.

Liu X, Lauer KK, Ward BD, Roberts CJ, Liu S, Gollapudy S, Rohloff R, Gross W, Xu Z, Chen G, Binder JR, Li SJ, Hudetz AG.

Brain Connect. 2017 Aug;7(6):373-381. doi: 10.1089/brain.2016.0477.

5.

Breakdown of within- and between-network resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging connectivity during propofol-induced loss of consciousness.

Boveroux P, Vanhaudenhuyse A, Bruno MA, Noirhomme Q, Lauwick S, Luxen A, Degueldre C, Plenevaux A, Schnakers C, Phillips C, Brichant JF, Bonhomme V, Maquet P, Greicius MD, Laureys S, Boly M.

Anesthesiology. 2010 Nov;113(5):1038-53. doi: 10.1097/ALN.0b013e3181f697f5.

6.

Multiphasic modification of intrinsic functional connectivity of the rat brain during increasing levels of propofol.

Liu X, Pillay S, Li R, Vizuete JA, Pechman KR, Schmainda KM, Hudetz AG.

Neuroimage. 2013 Dec;83:581-92. doi: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2013.07.003. Epub 2013 Jul 10.

7.

Posterior cingulate cortex-related co-activation patterns: a resting state FMRI study in propofol-induced loss of consciousness.

Amico E, Gomez F, Di Perri C, Vanhaudenhuyse A, Lesenfants D, Boveroux P, Bonhomme V, Brichant JF, Marinazzo D, Laureys S.

PLoS One. 2014 Jun 30;9(6):e100012. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0100012. eCollection 2014.

8.

Thalamus, brainstem and salience network connectivity changes during propofol-induced sedation and unconsciousness.

Guldenmund P, Demertzi A, Boveroux P, Boly M, Vanhaudenhuyse A, Bruno MA, Gosseries O, Noirhomme Q, Brichant JF, Bonhomme V, Laureys S, Soddu A.

Brain Connect. 2013;3(3):273-85. doi: 10.1089/brain.2012.0117.

9.

Auditory processing during deep propofol sedation and recovery from unconsciousness.

Koelsch S, Heinke W, Sammler D, Olthoff D.

Clin Neurophysiol. 2006 Aug;117(8):1746-59. Epub 2006 Jun 27.

PMID:
16807099
10.

Changes in resting neural connectivity during propofol sedation.

Stamatakis EA, Adapa RM, Absalom AR, Menon DK.

PLoS One. 2010 Dec 2;5(12):e14224. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0014224.

11.

Differential effects of deep sedation with propofol on the specific and nonspecific thalamocortical systems: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

Liu X, Lauer KK, Ward BD, Li SJ, Hudetz AG.

Anesthesiology. 2013 Jan;118(1):59-69. doi: 10.1097/ALN.0b013e318277a801.

12.

Brain functional integration decreases during propofol-induced loss of consciousness.

Schrouff J, Perlbarg V, Boly M, Marrelec G, Boveroux P, Vanhaudenhuyse A, Bruno MA, Laureys S, Phillips C, Pélégrini-Issac M, Maquet P, Benali H.

Neuroimage. 2011 Jul 1;57(1):198-205. doi: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2011.04.020. Epub 2011 Apr 16.

13.

Propofol attenuates low-frequency fluctuations of resting-state fMRI BOLD signal in the anterior frontal cortex upon loss of consciousness.

Liu X, Lauer KK, Douglas Ward B, Roberts C, Liu S, Gollapudy S, Rohloff R, Gross W, Chen G, Xu Z, Binder JR, Li SJ, Hudetz AG.

Neuroimage. 2017 Feb 15;147:295-301. doi: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2016.12.043. Epub 2016 Dec 16.

14.

Brain functional connectivity differentiates dexmedetomidine from propofol and natural sleep.

Guldenmund P, Vanhaudenhuyse A, Sanders RD, Sleigh J, Bruno MA, Demertzi A, Bahri MA, Jaquet O, Sanfilippo J, Baquero K, Boly M, Brichant JF, Laureys S, Bonhomme V.

Br J Anaesth. 2017 Oct 1;119(4):674-684. doi: 10.1093/bja/aex257.

15.

Directional connectivity between frontal and posterior brain regions is altered with increasing concentrations of propofol.

Maksimow A, Silfverhuth M, Långsjö J, Kaskinoro K, Georgiadis S, Jääskeläinen S, Scheinin H.

PLoS One. 2014 Nov 24;9(11):e113616. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0113616. eCollection 2014.

16.

Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage causes injury of the ascending reticular activating system: relation to consciousness.

Jang SH, Kim HS.

AJNR Am J Neuroradiol. 2015 Apr;36(4):667-71. doi: 10.3174/ajnr.A4203. Epub 2015 Jan 8.

17.

Disrupted neural variability during propofol-induced sedation and unconsciousness.

Huang Z, Zhang J, Wu J, Liu X, Xu J, Zhang J, Qin P, Dai R, Yang Z, Mao Y, Hudetz AG, Northoff G.

Hum Brain Mapp. 2018 Nov;39(11):4533-4544. doi: 10.1002/hbm.24304. Epub 2018 Jul 4.

PMID:
29974570
18.

Different effects of propofol and dexmedetomidine sedation on electroencephalogram patterns: Wakefulness, moderate sedation, deep sedation and recovery.

Xi C, Sun S, Pan C, Ji F, Cui X, Li T.

PLoS One. 2018 Jun 19;13(6):e0199120. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0199120. eCollection 2018.

19.

Neural correlates of consciousness in patients who have emerged from a minimally conscious state: a cross-sectional multimodal imaging study.

Di Perri C, Bahri MA, Amico E, Thibaut A, Heine L, Antonopoulos G, Charland-Verville V, Wannez S, Gomez F, Hustinx R, Tshibanda L, Demertzi A, Soddu A, Laureys S.

Lancet Neurol. 2016 Jul;15(8):830-842. doi: 10.1016/S1474-4422(16)00111-3. Epub 2016 Apr 27.

PMID:
27131917
20.

Automated responsiveness monitor to titrate propofol sedation.

Doufas AG, Morioka N, Mahgoub AN, Bjorksten AR, Shafer SL, Sessler DI.

Anesth Analg. 2009 Sep;109(3):778-86. doi: 10.1213/ane.0b013e3181b0fd0f.

PMID:
19690246

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