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Items: 1 to 20 of 101

1.

Resting-state Dynamics as a Cortical Signature of Anesthesia in Monkeys.

Uhrig L, Sitt JD, Jacob A, Tasserie J, Barttfeld P, Dupont M, Dehaene S, Jarraya B.

Anesthesiology. 2018 Nov;129(5):942-958. doi: 10.1097/ALN.0000000000002336.

PMID:
30028727
2.

Signature of consciousness in the dynamics of resting-state brain activity.

Barttfeld P, Uhrig L, Sitt JD, Sigman M, Jarraya B, Dehaene S.

Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2015 Jan 20;112(3):887-92. doi: 10.1073/pnas.1418031112. Epub 2015 Jan 5. Erratum in: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2015 Sep 15;112(37):E5219-20.

3.

Resting State fMRI in Mice Reveals Anesthesia Specific Signatures of Brain Functional Networks and Their Interactions.

Bukhari Q, Schroeter A, Cole DM, Rudin M.

Front Neural Circuits. 2017 Feb 3;11:5. doi: 10.3389/fncir.2017.00005. eCollection 2017.

4.

Functional connectivity under six anesthesia protocols and the awake condition in rat brain.

Paasonen J, Stenroos P, Salo RA, Kiviniemi V, Gröhn O.

Neuroimage. 2018 May 15;172:9-20. doi: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2018.01.014. Epub 2018 Jan 28.

5.

Multiphasic modification of intrinsic functional connectivity of the rat brain during increasing levels of propofol.

Liu X, Pillay S, Li R, Vizuete JA, Pechman KR, Schmainda KM, Hudetz AG.

Neuroimage. 2013 Dec;83:581-92. doi: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2013.07.003. Epub 2013 Jul 10.

6.

Disrupted neural variability during propofol-induced sedation and unconsciousness.

Huang Z, Zhang J, Wu J, Liu X, Xu J, Zhang J, Qin P, Dai R, Yang Z, Mao Y, Hudetz AG, Northoff G.

Hum Brain Mapp. 2018 Nov;39(11):4533-4544. doi: 10.1002/hbm.24304. Epub 2018 Jul 4.

PMID:
29974570
7.

Altered temporal variance and neural synchronization of spontaneous brain activity in anesthesia.

Huang Z, Wang Z, Zhang J, Dai R, Wu J, Li Y, Liang W, Mao Y, Yang Z, Holland G, Zhang J, Northoff G.

Hum Brain Mapp. 2014 Nov;35(11):5368-78. doi: 10.1002/hbm.22556. Epub 2014 May 28.

PMID:
24867379
8.

Interhemispheric resting-state functional connectivity of the claustrum in the awake and anesthetized states.

Smith JB, Liang Z, Watson GDR, Alloway KD, Zhang N.

Brain Struct Funct. 2017 Jul;222(5):2041-2058. doi: 10.1007/s00429-016-1323-9. Epub 2016 Oct 6.

9.
10.

Functional connectivity changes with concentration of sevoflurane anesthesia.

Peltier SJ, Kerssens C, Hamann SB, Sebel PS, Byas-Smith M, Hu X.

Neuroreport. 2005 Feb 28;16(3):285-8.

PMID:
15706237
11.

Fine-Grained Parcellation of Brain Connectivity Improves Differentiation of States of Consciousness During Graded Propofol Sedation.

Liu X, Lauer KK, Ward BD, Roberts CJ, Liu S, Gollapudy S, Rohloff R, Gross W, Xu Z, Chen G, Binder JR, Li SJ, Hudetz AG.

Brain Connect. 2017 Aug;7(6):373-381. doi: 10.1089/brain.2016.0477.

12.

Dynamic Connectivity Patterns in Conscious and Unconscious Brain.

Ma Y, Hamilton C, Zhang N.

Brain Connect. 2017 Feb;7(1):1-12. doi: 10.1089/brain.2016.0464. Epub 2016 Dec 15.

13.

Neural Correlates of Sevoflurane-induced Unconsciousness Identified by Simultaneous Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Electroencephalography.

Ranft A, Golkowski D, Kiel T, Riedl V, Kohl P, Rohrer G, Pientka J, Berger S, Thul A, Maurer M, Preibisch C, Zimmer C, Mashour GA, Kochs EF, Jordan D, Ilg R.

Anesthesiology. 2016 Nov;125(5):861-872.

14.

Mapping sensorimotor cortex with slow cortical potential resting-state networks while awake and under anesthesia.

Breshears JD, Gaona CM, Roland JL, Sharma M, Bundy DT, Shimony JS, Rashid S, Eisenman LN, Hogan RE, Snyder AZ, Leuthardt EC.

Neurosurgery. 2012 Aug;71(2):305-16; discussion 316. doi: 10.1227/NEU.0b013e318258e5d1.

15.

Sevoflurane Alters Spatiotemporal Functional Connectivity Motifs That Link Resting-State Networks during Wakefulness.

Kafashan M, Ching S, Palanca BJ.

Front Neural Circuits. 2016 Dec 27;10:107. doi: 10.3389/fncir.2016.00107. eCollection 2016.

16.

Optimization of anesthesia protocol for resting-state fMRI in mice based on differential effects of anesthetics on functional connectivity patterns.

Grandjean J, Schroeter A, Batata I, Rudin M.

Neuroimage. 2014 Nov 15;102 Pt 2:838-47. doi: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2014.08.043. Epub 2014 Aug 28.

PMID:
25175535
17.

Breakdown in the temporal and spatial organization of spontaneous brain activity during general anesthesia.

Zhang J, Huang Z, Chen Y, Zhang J, Ghinda D, Nikolova Y, Wu J, Xu J, Bai W, Mao Y, Yang Z, Duncan N, Qin P, Wang H, Chen B, Weng X, Northoff G.

Hum Brain Mapp. 2018 May;39(5):2035-2046. doi: 10.1002/hbm.23984. Epub 2018 Jan 28.

18.

Simultaneous electroencephalographic and functional magnetic resonance imaging indicate impaired cortical top-down processing in association with anesthetic-induced unconsciousness.

Jordan D, Ilg R, Riedl V, Schorer A, Grimberg S, Neufang S, Omerovic A, Berger S, Untergehrer G, Preibisch C, Schulz E, Schuster T, Schröter M, Spoormaker V, Zimmer C, Hemmer B, Wohlschläger A, Kochs EF, Schneider G.

Anesthesiology. 2013 Nov;119(5):1031-42. doi: 10.1097/ALN.0b013e3182a7ca92.

PMID:
23969561
19.

Disruption of frontal-parietal communication by ketamine, propofol, and sevoflurane.

Lee U, Ku S, Noh G, Baek S, Choi B, Mashour GA.

Anesthesiology. 2013 Jun;118(6):1264-75. doi: 10.1097/ALN.0b013e31829103f5.

20.

Breakdown of within- and between-network resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging connectivity during propofol-induced loss of consciousness.

Boveroux P, Vanhaudenhuyse A, Bruno MA, Noirhomme Q, Lauwick S, Luxen A, Degueldre C, Plenevaux A, Schnakers C, Phillips C, Brichant JF, Bonhomme V, Maquet P, Greicius MD, Laureys S, Boly M.

Anesthesiology. 2010 Nov;113(5):1038-53. doi: 10.1097/ALN.0b013e3181f697f5.

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