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Items: 1 to 20 of 113

1.

Direct Electrical Stimulation in the Human Brain Disrupts Melody Processing.

Garcea FE, Chernoff BL, Diamond B, Lewis W, Sims MH, Tomlinson SB, Teghipco A, Belkhir R, Gannon SB, Erickson S, Smith SO, Stone J, Liu L, Tollefson T, Langfitt J, Marvin E, Pilcher WH, Mahon BZ.

Curr Biol. 2017 Sep 11;27(17):2684-2691.e7. doi: 10.1016/j.cub.2017.07.051. Epub 2017 Aug 24.

2.

Contributions to singing ability by the posterior portion of the superior temporal gyrus of the non-language-dominant hemisphere: first evidence from subdural cortical stimulation, Wada testing, and fMRI.

Suarez RO, Golby A, Whalen S, Sato S, Theodore WH, Kufta CV, Devinsky O, Balish M, Bromfield EB.

Cortex. 2010 Mar;46(3):343-53. doi: 10.1016/j.cortex.2009.04.010. Epub 2009 May 18.

3.

[Dissociations between music and language functions after cerebral resection: A new case of amusia without aphasia].

Peretz I, Belleville S, Fontaine S.

Can J Exp Psychol. 1997 Dec;51(4):354-68. French.

PMID:
9687196
4.

[Amusia and its topic specification].

Buklina SB, Skvortsova VB.

Zh Nevrol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova. 2007;107(9):4-10. Russian.

PMID:
18379455
5.

Receptive amusia: temporal auditory processing deficit in a professional musician following a left temporo-parietal lesion.

Di Pietro M, Laganaro M, Leemann B, Schnider A.

Neuropsychologia. 2004;42(7):868-77.

PMID:
14998702
6.

Neural substrates for semantic memory of familiar songs: is there an interface between lyrics and melodies?

Saito Y, Ishii K, Sakuma N, Kawasaki K, Oda K, Mizusawa H.

PLoS One. 2012;7(9):e46354. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0046354. Epub 2012 Sep 28.

7.

Impaired pitch perception and memory in congenital amusia: the deficit starts in the auditory cortex.

Albouy P, Mattout J, Bouet R, Maby E, Sanchez G, Aguera PE, Daligault S, Delpuech C, Bertrand O, Caclin A, Tillmann B.

Brain. 2013 May;136(Pt 5):1639-61. doi: 10.1093/brain/awt082.

PMID:
23616587
8.

Neural bases of congenital amusia in tonal language speakers.

Zhang C, Peng G, Shao J, Wang WS.

Neuropsychologia. 2017 Mar;97:18-28. doi: 10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2017.01.033. Epub 2017 Jan 31.

PMID:
28153640
9.

Syntactic processing in music and language: Parallel abnormalities observed in congenital amusia.

Sun Y, Lu X, Ho HT, Johnson BW, Sammler D, Thompson WF.

Neuroimage Clin. 2018 May 24;19:640-651. doi: 10.1016/j.nicl.2018.05.032. eCollection 2018.

10.

Music recognition in frontotemporal lobar degeneration and Alzheimer disease.

Johnson JK, Chang CC, Brambati SM, Migliaccio R, Gorno-Tempini ML, Miller BL, Janata P.

Cogn Behav Neurol. 2011 Jun;24(2):74-84. doi: 10.1097/WNN.0b013e31821de326.

11.

Functional neural changes associated with acquired amusia across different stages of recovery after stroke.

Sihvonen AJ, Särkämö T, Ripollés P, Leo V, Saunavaara J, Parkkola R, Rodríguez-Fornells A, Soinila S.

Sci Rep. 2017 Sep 12;7(1):11390. doi: 10.1038/s41598-017-11841-6.

12.

Music listening engages specific cortical regions within the temporal lobes: differences between musicians and non-musicians.

Angulo-Perkins A, Aubé W, Peretz I, Barrios FA, Armony JL, Concha L.

Cortex. 2014 Oct;59:126-37. doi: 10.1016/j.cortex.2014.07.013. Epub 2014 Aug 12.

PMID:
25173956
13.

Preservation of cognitive and musical abilities of a musician following surgery for chronic drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy: a case report.

Hegde S, Bharath RD, Rao MB, Shiva K, Arimappamagan A, Sinha S, Rajeswaran J, Satishchandra P.

Neurocase. 2016 Dec;22(6):512-517. doi: 10.1080/13554794.2016.1198815. Epub 2016 Jul 1.

PMID:
27367173
14.

Neural Basis of Acquired Amusia and Its Recovery after Stroke.

Sihvonen AJ, Ripollés P, Leo V, Rodríguez-Fornells A, Soinila S, Särkämö T.

J Neurosci. 2016 Aug 24;36(34):8872-81. doi: 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.0709-16.2016.

15.

[Music Processing in the Brain: Neuropsychological Approach Through Findings of Patients with Amusia].

Satoh M.

Brain Nerve. 2017 Jun;69(6):615-627. doi: 10.11477/mf.1416200793. Japanese.

PMID:
28596464
16.

Vocal amusia in a professional tango singer due to a right superior temporal cortex infarction.

Terao Y, Mizuno T, Shindoh M, Sakurai Y, Ugawa Y, Kobayashi S, Nagai C, Furubayashi T, Arai N, Okabe S, Mochizuki H, Hanajima R, Tsuji S.

Neuropsychologia. 2006;44(3):479-88. Epub 2005 Jun 27.

PMID:
15982678
17.

Musical familiarity in congenital amusia: evidence from a gating paradigm.

Tillmann B, Albouy P, Caclin A, Bigand E.

Cortex. 2014 Oct;59:84-94. doi: 10.1016/j.cortex.2014.07.012. Epub 2014 Aug 5.

PMID:
25151640
18.

Song and speech: brain regions involved with perception and covert production.

Callan DE, Tsytsarev V, Hanakawa T, Callan AM, Katsuhara M, Fukuyama H, Turner R.

Neuroimage. 2006 Jul 1;31(3):1327-42. Epub 2006 Mar 20.

PMID:
16546406
19.

Congenital amusia: a group study of adults afflicted with a music-specific disorder.

Ayotte J, Peretz I, Hyde K.

Brain. 2002 Feb;125(Pt 2):238-51.

PMID:
11844725
20.

Contribution of different cortical areas in the temporal lobes to music processing.

Liégeois-Chauvel C, Peretz I, Babaï M, Laguitton V, Chauvel P.

Brain. 1998 Oct;121 ( Pt 10):1853-67.

PMID:
9798742

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