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Sci Adv. 2016 Jul 20;2(7):e1600319. doi: 10.1126/sciadv.1600319. eCollection 2016 Jul.

High hardness in the biocompatible intermetallic compound β-Ti3Au.

Author information

1
Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, Houston, TX 77005, USA.
2
National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32310, USA.
3
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843, USA.
4
Materials Science and NanoEngineering, Rice University, Houston, TX 77005, USA.
5
Department of Translational Molecular Pathology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77005, USA.
6
Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, Houston, TX 77005, USA.; Materials Science and NanoEngineering, Rice University, Houston, TX 77005, USA.

Abstract

The search for new hard materials is often challenging, but strongly motivated by the vast application potential such materials hold. Ti3Au exhibits high hardness values (about four times those of pure Ti and most steel alloys), reduced coefficient of friction and wear rates, and biocompatibility, all of which are optimal traits for orthopedic, dental, and prosthetic applications. In addition, the ability of this compound to adhere to ceramic parts can reduce both the weight and the cost of medical components. The fourfold increase in the hardness of Ti3Au compared to other Ti-Au alloys and compounds can be attributed to the elevated valence electron density, the reduced bond length, and the pseudogap formation. Understanding the origin of hardness in this intermetallic compound provides an avenue toward designing superior biocompatible, hard materials.

KEYWORDS:

Biocompatible alloys; coefficient of friction; elevated electron density; gold alloys; hardness; medical applications; metals; pseudogap; titanium alloys; titanium gold alloys

PMID:
27453942
PMCID:
PMC4956191
DOI:
10.1126/sciadv.1600319
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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