Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Sci Adv. 2016 May 13;2(5):e1600375. doi: 10.1126/sciadv.1600375. eCollection 2016 May.

Pre-Clovis occupation 14,550 years ago at the Page-Ladson site, Florida, and the peopling of the Americas.

Author information

1
Department of Anthropology, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306, USA.
2
Center for the Study of the First Americans, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843, USA.; Department of Anthropology, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843, USA.; Department of Geography, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843, USA.
3
Department of Anthropology, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843, USA.
4
Department of Archaeology, University of Exeter, Exeter EX4 4QE, UK.; The Charles McBurney Laboratory for Geoarchaeology, Division of Archaeology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3DZ, UK.
5
University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA.; Institute for Rock Magnetism, Department of Earth Sciences, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA.
6
Department of Geosciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA.
7
Texas Memorial Museum, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78705, USA.
8
Museum of Paleontology and Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA.
9
Stafford Research Laboratories, Lafayette, CO 80026, USA.
10
Aucilla Research Institute Inc., 555 North Jefferson Street, Monticello, FL 32344, USA.

Abstract

Stone tools and mastodon bones occur in an undisturbed geological context at the Page-Ladson site, Florida. Seventy-one radiocarbon ages show that ~14,550 calendar years ago (cal yr B.P.), people butchered or scavenged a mastodon next to a pond in a bedrock sinkhole within the Aucilla River. This occupation surface was buried by ~4 m of sediment during the late Pleistocene marine transgression, which also left the site submerged. Sporormiella and other proxy evidence from the sediments indicate that hunter-gatherers along the Gulf Coastal Plain coexisted with and utilized megafauna for ~2000 years before these animals became extinct at ~12,600 cal yr B.P. Page-Ladson expands our understanding of the earliest colonizers of the Americas and human-megafauna interaction before extinction.

KEYWORDS:

Archaeology; Florida; Late Pleistocene; Megafauna Extinction; Page-Ladson; Paleoindian; Pre-Clovis; Prehistoric America; Sporormiella; underwater archaeology

PMID:
27386553
PMCID:
PMC4928949
DOI:
10.1126/sciadv.1600375
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center