Format
Sort by
Items per page

Send to

Choose Destination

Links from PubMed

Items: 9

1.

Time to turn the other cheek? The influence of left and right poses on perceptions of academic specialisation.

Lindell AK, Savill NJ.

Laterality. 2010 Nov;15(6):639-50. doi: 10.1080/13576500903201784. Epub 2009 Sep 16.

PMID:
19760533
2.

Study of posed emotion in facial EMG asymmetry.

Zhou R, Hu S.

Percept Mot Skills. 2006 Apr;102(2):430-4.

PMID:
16826664
3.
4.

EXPERIMENTAL AND CLINICAL STUDIES OF THE CENTRAL CONNECTIONS AND CENTRAL RELATIONS OF THE FACIAL NERVE.

CROSBY EC, DEJONGE BR.

Ann Otol Rhinol Laryngol. 1963 Sep;72:735-55. No abstract available.

PMID:
14062422
5.

Which cheek to turn? The effect of gender and emotional expressivity on posing behavior.

Nicholls ME, Clode D, Lindell AK, Wood AG.

Brain Cogn. 2002 Mar-Apr;48(2-3):480-4.

PMID:
12030492
6.

The effect of left and right poses on the expression of facial emotion.

Nicholls ME, Wolfgang BJ, Clode D, Lindell AK.

Neuropsychologia. 2002;40(10):1662-5.

PMID:
11992654
7.

Laterality of expression in portraiture: putting your best cheek forward.

Nicholls ME, Clode D, Wood SJ, Wood AG.

Proc Biol Sci. 1999 Aug 7;266(1428):1517-22.

8.

Differential impact of right and left hemisphere lesions on facial emotion and object imagery.

Bowers D, Blonder LX, Feinberg T, Heilman KM.

Brain. 1991 Dec;114 ( Pt 6):2593-609.

PMID:
1782533
9.

Emotions are expressed more intensely on the left side of the face.

Sackeim HA, Gur RC, Saucy MC.

Science. 1978 Oct 27;202(4366):434-6.

PMID:
705335

Supplemental Content

Support Center