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Items: 1 to 20 of 41

1.

Prenatal airborne polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon exposure and child IQ at age 5 years.

Perera FP, Li Z, Whyatt R, Hoepner L, Wang S, Camann D, Rauh V.

Pediatrics. 2009 Aug;124(2):e195-202. doi: 10.1542/peds.2008-3506. Epub 2009 Jul 20.

2.

Gender specific differences in neurodevelopmental effects of prenatal exposure to very low-lead levels: the prospective cohort study in three-year olds.

Jedrychowski W, Perera F, Jankowski J, Mrozek-Budzyn D, Mroz E, Flak E, Edwards S, Skarupa A, Lisowska-Miszczyk I.

Early Hum Dev. 2009 Aug;85(8):503-10. doi: 10.1016/j.earlhumdev.2009.04.006. Epub 2009 May 17.

3.

Neurocognitive screening of lead-exposed andean adolescents and young adults.

Counter SA, Buchanan LH, Ortega F.

J Toxicol Environ Health A. 2009;72(10):625-32. doi: 10.1080/15287390902769410.

PMID:
19308847
4.

Very low prenatal exposure to lead and mental development of children in infancy and early childhood: Krakow prospective cohort study.

Jedrychowski W, Perera FP, Jankowski J, Mrozek-Budzyn D, Mroz E, Flak E, Edwards S, Skarupa A, Lisowska-Miszczyk I.

Neuroepidemiology. 2009;32(4):270-8. doi: 10.1159/000203075. Epub 2009 Feb 18.

5.

Relation of DNA methylation of 5'-CpG island of ACSL3 to transplacental exposure to airborne polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and childhood asthma.

Perera F, Tang WY, Herbstman J, Tang D, Levin L, Miller R, Ho SM.

PLoS One. 2009;4(2):e4488. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0004488. Epub 2009 Feb 16. Erratum in: PLoS One. 2009;4(8). doi: 10.1371/annotation/6a678269-9623-4a13-8b19-4e9431ff3cb6.

6.

Estimating individual-level exposure to airborne polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons throughout the gestational period based on personal, indoor, and outdoor monitoring.

Choi H, Perera F, Pac A, Wang L, Flak E, Mroz E, Jacek R, Chai-Onn T, Jedrychowski W, Masters E, Camann D, Spengler J.

Environ Health Perspect. 2008 Nov;116(11):1509-18. doi: 10.1289/ehp.10972. Epub 2008 Jul 16.

7.

Personal exposure to fine particles and benzo[a]pyrene. Relation with indoor and outdoor concentrations of these pollutants in Kraków.

Jedrychowski W, Pac A, Choi H, Jacek R, Sochacka-Tatara E, Dumyahn TS, Spengler JD, Camann DE, Perera FP.

Int J Occup Med Environ Health. 2007;20(4):339-48.

PMID:
18655236
8.

International studies of prenatal exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and fetal growth.

Choi H, Jedrychowski W, Spengler J, Camann DE, Whyatt RM, Rauh V, Tsai WY, Perera FP.

Environ Health Perspect. 2006 Nov;114(11):1744-50.

9.

Measurement of urinary monohydroxy polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons using automated liquid-liquid extraction and gas chromatography/isotope dilution high-resolution mass spectrometry.

Li Z, Romanoff LC, Trinidad DA, Hussain N, Jones RS, Porter EN, Patterson DG Jr, Sjödin A.

Anal Chem. 2006 Aug 15;78(16):5744-51.

PMID:
16906719
10.

Effect of prenatal exposure to airborne polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons on neurodevelopment in the first 3 years of life among inner-city children.

Perera FP, Rauh V, Whyatt RM, Tsai WY, Tang D, Diaz D, Hoepner L, Barr D, Tu YH, Camann D, Kinney P.

Environ Health Perspect. 2006 Aug;114(8):1287-92.

11.

Benzo(a)pyrene-induced acute neurotoxicity in the F-344 rat: role of oxidative stress.

Saunders CR, Das SK, Ramesh A, Shockley DC, Mukherjee S.

J Appl Toxicol. 2006 Sep-Oct;26(5):427-38.

PMID:
16858674
12.

Reading development and impairment: behavioral, social, and neurobiological factors.

Noble KG, McCandliss BD.

J Dev Behav Pediatr. 2005 Oct;26(5):370-8. Review.

PMID:
16222178
13.
14.

Neurocognitive impairment in lead-exposed children of Andean lead-glazing workers.

Counter SA, Buchanan LH, Ortega F.

J Occup Environ Med. 2005 Mar;47(3):306-12.

PMID:
15761328
15.

Endocrine-disrupting activity of chemicals in diesel exhaust and diesel exhaust particles.

Takeda K, Tsukue N, Yoshida S.

Environ Sci. 2004;11(1):33-45. Review.

PMID:
15746887
16.

The developmental origins of adult disease.

Barker DJ.

J Am Coll Nutr. 2004 Dec;23(6 Suppl):588S-595S. Review.

PMID:
15640511
17.

Estimated risk for altered fetal growth resulting from exposure to fine particles during pregnancy: an epidemiologic prospective cohort study in Poland.

Jedrychowski W, Bendkowska I, Flak E, Penar A, Jacek R, Kaim I, Spengler JD, Camann D, Perera FP.

Environ Health Perspect. 2004 Oct;112(14):1398-402.

18.

Environmental contaminant-mixture effects on CNS development, plasticity, and behavior.

Wormley DD, Ramesh A, Hood DB.

Toxicol Appl Pharmacol. 2004 May 15;197(1):49-65. Review.

PMID:
15126074
19.

Predictors of personal polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon exposures among pregnant minority women in New York City.

Tonne CC, Whyatt RM, Camann DE, Perera FP, Kinney PL.

Environ Health Perspect. 2004 May;112(6):754-9.

20.

Environmental causes of central nervous system maldevelopment.

Rodier PM.

Pediatrics. 2004 Apr;113(4 Suppl):1076-83. Review.

PMID:
15060202

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