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Items: 17

1.

Attitude and norm accessibility affect processing of anti-smoking messages.

Rhodes N, Roskos-Ewoldsen DR, Edison A, Bradford MB.

Health Psychol. 2008 May;27(3S):S224-32.

PMID:
18979975
2.

Adolescents' responses to anti-tobacco advertising: exploring the role of adolescents' smoking status and advertisement theme.

Sutfin EL, Szykman LR, Moore MC.

J Health Commun. 2008 Jul-Aug;13(5):480-500. doi: 10.1080/10810730802198961.

PMID:
18661389
3.

Sustaining 'truth': changes in youth tobacco attitudes and smoking intentions after 3 years of a national antismoking campaign.

Farrelly MC, Davis KC, Duke J, Messeri P.

Health Educ Res. 2009 Feb;24(1):42-8. doi: 10.1093/her/cym087. Epub 2008 Jan 17.

PMID:
18203679
4.

Antismoking advertisements for youths: an independent evaluation of health, counter-industry, and industry approaches.

Pechmann C, Reibling ET.

Am J Public Health. 2006 May;96(5):906-13. Epub 2006 Mar 29.

5.

The impact of emotional tone, message, and broadcast parameters in youth anti-smoking advertisements.

Biener L, Ji M, Gilpin EA, Albers AB.

J Health Commun. 2004 May-Jun;9(3):259-74.

PMID:
15360037
6.

The impact of anti-tobacco industry prevention messages in tobacco producing regions: evidence from the US truth campaign.

Thrasher JF, Niederdeppe J, Farrelly MC, Davis KC, Ribisl KM, Haviland ML.

Tob Control. 2004 Sep;13(3):283-8.

7.

Confirming "truth": more evidence of a successful tobacco countermarketing campaign in Florida.

Niederdeppe J, Farrelly MC, Haviland ML.

Am J Public Health. 2004 Feb;94(2):255-7.

8.

Effects of anti-smoking advertising on youth smoking: a review.

Wakefield M, Flay B, Nichter M, Giovino G.

J Health Commun. 2003 May-Jun;8(3):229-47. Review.

PMID:
12857653
9.

Smoking cessation during the transition from adolescence to young adulthood.

Tucker JS, Ellickson PL, Klein DJ.

Nicotine Tob Res. 2002 Aug;4(3):321-32.

PMID:
12215241
10.

Exploring antismoking ads: appeals, themes, and consequences.

Beaudoin CE.

J Health Commun. 2002 Mar-Apr;7(2):123-37.

PMID:
12049421
11.

Getting to the truth: evaluating national tobacco countermarketing campaigns.

Farrelly MC, Healton CG, Davis KC, Messeri P, Hersey JC, Haviland ML.

Am J Public Health. 2002 Jun;92(6):901-7. Erratum in: Am J Public Health. 2003 May;93(5):703.

12.
13.

Determining the probability of future smoking among adolescents.

Choi WS, Gilpin EA, Farkas AJ, Pierce JP.

Addiction. 2001 Feb;96(2):313-23.

PMID:
11182877
14.
15.

Evaluation of antismoking advertising campaigns.

Goldman LK, Glantz SA.

JAMA. 1998 Mar 11;279(10):772-7.

PMID:
9508154
16.

Psychosocial predictors of cigarette smoking onset by white, black, Hispanic, and Asian adolescents in Southern California.

Sussman S, Dent CW, Flay BR, Hansen WB, Johnson CA; Centers for Disease Control (CDC).

MMWR Suppl. 1987 Sep 4;36(4):11S-16S. No abstract available.

PMID:
3116391
17.

On becoming involved with drugs: modeling adolescent drug use over time.

Ellickson PL, Hays RD.

Health Psychol. 1992;11(6):377-85.

PMID:
1286657

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