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Items: 1 to 20 of 258

1.

When true recognition suppresses false recognition: evidence from amnesic patients.

Schacter DL, Verfaellie M, Anes MD, Racine C.

J Cogn Neurosci. 1998 Nov;10(6):668-79.

PMID:
9831736
2.

When true memory availability promotes false memory: evidence from confabulating patients.

Ciaramelli E, Ghetti S, Frattarelli M, Làdavas E.

Neuropsychologia. 2006;44(10):1866-77. Epub 2006 Mar 31.

PMID:
16580028
3.

Spatial memory in amnesia: evidence from Korsakoff patients.

MacAndrew SB, Jones GV.

Cortex. 1993 Jun;29(2):235-49.

PMID:
8348822
4.
5.

Illusory memories in amnesic patients: conceptual and perceptual false recognition.

Schacter DL, Verfaellie M, Anes MD.

Neuropsychology. 1997 Jul;11(3):331-42.

PMID:
9223138
6.

Memory for the temporal order of events in patients with frontal lobe lesions and amnesic patients.

Shimamura AP, Janowsky JS, Squire LR.

Neuropsychologia. 1990;28(8):803-13.

PMID:
2247207
7.

Do amnesics forget faces pathologically fast?

Mayes AR, Downes JJ, Symons V, Shoqeirat M.

Cortex. 1994 Dec;30(4):543-63.

PMID:
7697984
8.

No selective deficit in recall in amnesia.

MacAndrew SB, Jones GV, Mayes AR.

Memory. 1994 Sep;2(3):241-54.

PMID:
7584294
9.

Strength and duration of priming effects in normal subjects and amnesic patients.

Squire LR, Shimamura AP, Graf P.

Neuropsychologia. 1987;25(1B):195-210.

PMID:
3574658
10.

A study of metamemory in amnesic and normal adults.

Parkin AJ, Bell WP, Leng NR.

Cortex. 1988 Mar;24(1):143-8.

PMID:
3371010
11.

Knowledge of New English vocabulary in amnesia: an examination of premorbidly acquired semantic memory.

Verfaellie M, Reiss L, Roth HL.

J Int Neuropsychol Soc. 1995 Sep;1(5):443-53.

PMID:
9375230
12.

Suppression of false recognition in Alzheimer's disease and in patients with frontal lobe lesions.

Budson AE, Sullivan AL, Mayer E, Daffner KR, Black PM, Schacter DL.

Brain. 2002 Dec;125(Pt 12):2750-65.

PMID:
12429602
13.

Amnesics have a disproportionately severe memory deficit for interactive context.

Mayes AR, MacDonald C, Donlan L, Pears J, Meudell PR.

Q J Exp Psychol A. 1992 Aug;45(2):265-97.

PMID:
1410558
14.

Word repetition in amnesia. Electrophysiological measures of impaired and spared memory.

Olichney JM, Van Petten C, Paller KA, Salmon DP, Iragui VJ, Kutas M.

Brain. 2000 Sep;123 ( Pt 9):1948-63.

PMID:
10960058
15.

Implicit false memory in the DRM paradigm: effects of amnesia, encoding instructions, and encoding duration.

Van Damme I, d'Ydewalle G.

Neuropsychology. 2009 Sep;23(5):635-48. doi: 10.1037/a0016017.

PMID:
19702417
16.

A verbal semantic deficit in the alcoholic Korsakoff syndrome.

Kovner R, Mattis S, Gartner J, Goldmeier E.

Cortex. 1981 Oct;17(3):419-26.

PMID:
7333115
17.

Contextual cuing and memory performance in brain-damaged amnesics and old people.

Winocur G, Moscovitch M, Witherspoon D.

Brain Cogn. 1987 Apr;6(2):129-41.

PMID:
3593553
18.

An assessment of verbal recall, recognition and fluency abilities in patients with Huntington's disease.

Butters N, Wolfe J, Granholm E, Martone M.

Cortex. 1986 Mar;22(1):11-32.

PMID:
2940074
19.

Recognition and recall in amnesics.

Hirst W, Johnson MK, Kim JK, Phelps EA, Risse G, Volpe BT.

J Exp Psychol Learn Mem Cogn. 1986 Jul;12(3):445-51.

PMID:
2942628
20.

Memory for subject performed tasks in patients with Korsakoff syndrome.

Mimura M, Komatsu S, Kato M, Yashimasu H, Wakamatsu N, Kashima H.

Cortex. 1998 Apr;34(2):297-303.

PMID:
9606595

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