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Items: 1 to 20 of 106

1.

Pseudomonas maltophilia bacteremia in children undergoing open heart surgery.

Fisher MC, Long SS, Roberts EM, Dunn JM, Balsara RK.

JAMA. 1981 Oct 2;246(14):1571-4.

PMID:
7277630
2.
3.

Epidemic bloodstream infections associated with pressure transducers: a persistent problem.

Beck-Sague CM, Jarvis WR.

Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 1989 Feb;10(2):54-9.

PMID:
2926106
4.

Gram-negative bacteremia in open-heart-surgery patients traced to probable tap-water contamination of pressure-monitoring equipment.

Rudnick JR, Beck-Sague CM, Anderson RL, Schable B, Miller JM, Jarvis WR.

Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 1996 May;17(5):281-5.

PMID:
8727616
5.
6.

Pressure transducers: an overlooked source of sepsis in the intensive care unit.

Hekker TA, van Overhagen W, Schneider AJ.

Intensive Care Med. 1990;16(8):511-2.

PMID:
2286732
7.

Pseudomonas sternotomy wound infection and sternal osteomyelitis. Complications after open heart surgery.

Stiver HG, Clark J, Kennedy J, Cohen M.

JAMA. 1979 Mar 9;241(10):1034-6.

PMID:
105156
8.
9.

Pseudomonas paucimobilis bacteremia.

Southern PM Jr, Kutscher AE.

J Clin Microbiol. 1981 Jun;13(6):1070-3.

10.

Infection with Pseudomonas maltophilia hospital outbreak due to contaminated disinfectant.

Wishart MM, Riley TV.

Med J Aust. 1976 Nov 6;2(19):710-2.

PMID:
1004317
11.

Water-borne contamination of intrauterine pressure transducers.

Baker DA, Mead PB, Gallant JM, Hayward RG, Hamel AJ.

Am J Obstet Gynecol. 1979 Apr 15;133(8):923-4.

PMID:
434037
12.

Epidemic of Serratia marcescens bacteremia in a cardiac intensive care unit.

Villarino ME, Jarvis WR, O'Hara C, Bresnahan J, Clark N.

J Clin Microbiol. 1989 Nov;27(11):2433-6.

13.

Pseudomonas maltophilia pseudosepticemia.

Semel JD, Trenholme GM, Harris AA, Jupa JE, Levin S.

Am J Med. 1978 Mar;64(3):403-6.

PMID:
637055
14.

Sternal osteomyelitis and mediastinitis after open-heart operation: pathogenesis and prevention.

Weinstein RA, Jones EL, Schwarzmann SW, Hatcher CR Jr.

Ann Thorac Surg. 1976 May;21(5):442-4.

PMID:
1083719
15.

Serratia marcescens bacteremia from contaminated pressure transducers.

Donowitz LG, Marsik FJ, Hoyt JW, Wenzel RP.

JAMA. 1979 Oct 19;242(16):1749-51.

PMID:
384037
16.

Outbreak of multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection following urodynamic studies traced to contaminated transducer.

Bilavsky E, Pfeffer I, Tarabeia J, Schechner V, Abu-Hanna J, Grisaru-Soen G, Schwartz D, Navon-Venezia S, Carmeli Y.

J Hosp Infect. 2013 Apr;83(4):344-6. doi: 10.1016/j.jhin.2013.01.003.

PMID:
23419597
17.

Nosocomial outbreak of multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa caused by damaged transesophageal echocardiogram probe used in cardiovascular surgical operations.

Seki M, Machida H, Yamagishi Y, Yoshida H, Tomono K.

J Infect Chemother. 2013 Aug;19(4):677-81. doi: 10.1007/s10156-012-0542-0. Erratum in: J Infect Chemother. 2013 Aug;19(4):682. Machida, Naoko [corrected to Machida, Hisako].

PMID:
23292134
18.

Nosocomial bacteremia associated with contaminated blood pressure transducers: report of an outbreak and a review of the literature.

Aduan RP, Iannini PB, Salaki J.

Am J Infect Control. 1980 May;8(2):33-40. Review. No abstract available.

PMID:
10297850
19.

Pressure monitoring devices. Overlooked source of nosocomial infection.

Weinstein RA, Stamm WE, Kramer L, Corey L.

JAMA. 1976 Aug 23;236(8):936-8.

PMID:
988891
20.

Pseudobacteremia caused by povidone-iodine solution contaminated with Pseudomonas cepacia.

Craven DE, Moody B, Connolly MG, Kollisch NR, Stottmeier KD, McCabe WR.

N Engl J Med. 1981 Sep 10;305(11):621-3. No abstract available.

PMID:
7022209
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