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Items: 1 to 20 of 130

1.

Sex-specific effects of a parasite evolving in a female-biased host population.

Duneau D, Luijckx P, Ruder LF, Ebert D.

BMC Biol. 2012 Dec 18;10:104. doi: 10.1186/1741-7007-10-104.

2.

Resolving the infection process reveals striking differences in the contribution of environment, genetics and phylogeny to host-parasite interactions.

Duneau D, Luijckx P, Ben-Ami F, Laforsch C, Ebert D.

BMC Biol. 2011 Feb 22;9:11. doi: 10.1186/1741-7007-9-11.

3.

Who benefits from reduced reproduction in parasitized hosts? An experimental test using the Pasteuria ramosa-Daphnia magna system.

Mageroy JH, Grepperud EJ, Jensen KH.

Parasitology. 2011 Dec;138(14):1910-5. doi: 10.1017/S0031182011001302. Epub 2011 Aug 19.

PMID:
21854675
4.

The evolution of virulence when parasites cause host castration and gigantism.

Ebert D, Carius HJ, Little T, Decaestecker E.

Am Nat. 2004 Nov;164 Suppl 5:S19-32.

PMID:
15540139
5.

The expression of virulence during double infections by different parasites with conflicting host exploitation and transmission strategies.

Ben-Ami F, Rigaud T, Ebert D.

J Evol Biol. 2011 Jun;24(6):1307-16. doi: 10.1111/j.1420-9101.2011.02264.x. Epub 2011 Apr 11.

7.

Host-parasite coevolution: Insights from the Daphnia-parasite model system.

Ebert D.

Curr Opin Microbiol. 2008 Jun;11(3):290-301. doi: 10.1016/j.mib.2008.05.012. Epub 2008 Jun 13. Review.

PMID:
18556238
8.

The infection rate of Daphnia magna by Pasteuria ramosa conforms with the mass-action principle.

Regoes RR, Hottinger JW, Sygnarski L, Ebert D.

Epidemiol Infect. 2003 Oct;131(2):957-66.

9.

Experimental evolution of field populations of Daphnia magna in response to parasite treatment.

Zbinden M, Haag CR, Ebert D.

J Evol Biol. 2008 Jul;21(4):1068-78. doi: 10.1111/j.1420-9101.2008.01541.x. Epub 2008 May 7.

10.

The genetic basis of resistance and matching-allele interactions of a host-parasite system: The Daphnia magna-Pasteuria ramosa model.

Bento G, Routtu J, Fields PD, Bourgeois Y, Du Pasquier L, Ebert D.

PLoS Genet. 2017 Feb 21;13(2):e1006596. doi: 10.1371/journal.pgen.1006596. eCollection 2017 Feb.

11.

Sex as a strategy against rapidly evolving parasites.

Auld SK, Tinkler SK, Tinsley MC.

Proc Biol Sci. 2016 Dec 28;283(1845). pii: 20162226. doi: 10.1098/rspb.2016.2226.

12.

Parasite-mediated selection in experimental Daphnia magna populations.

Capaul M, Ebert D.

Evolution. 2003 Feb;57(2):249-60.

PMID:
12683522
13.

Host age modulates parasite infectivity, virulence and reproduction.

Izhar R, Ben-Ami F.

J Anim Ecol. 2015 Jul;84(4):1018-28. doi: 10.1111/1365-2656.12352. Epub 2015 Mar 18.

PMID:
25661269
14.

Starvation reveals the cause of infection-induced castration and gigantism.

Cressler CE, Nelson WA, Day T, McCauley E.

Proc Biol Sci. 2014 Oct 7;281(1792). pii: 20141087. doi: 10.1098/rspb.2014.1087.

15.

Ecological implications of parasites in natural Daphnia populations.

Decaestecker E, Declerck S, De Meester L, Ebert D.

Oecologia. 2005 Jul;144(3):382-90. Epub 2005 Sep 16.

PMID:
15891825
16.

The role of moulting in parasite defence.

Duneau D, Ebert D.

Proc Biol Sci. 2012 Aug 7;279(1740):3049-54. doi: 10.1098/rspb.2012.0407. Epub 2012 Apr 11.

17.

Epidemiology of a Daphnia-multiparasite system and its implications for the red queen.

Auld SK, Hall SR, Duffy MA.

PLoS One. 2012;7(6):e39564. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0039564. Epub 2012 Jun 25.

18.

Host age modulates within-host parasite competition.

Izhar R, Routtu J, Ben-Ami F.

Biol Lett. 2015 May;11(5):20150131. doi: 10.1098/rsbl.2015.0131.

19.

A matching-allele model explains host resistance to parasites.

Luijckx P, Fienberg H, Duneau D, Ebert D.

Curr Biol. 2013 Jun 17;23(12):1085-8. doi: 10.1016/j.cub.2013.04.064. Epub 2013 May 23.

20.

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