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Items: 1 to 20 of 104

1.

Tranexamic acid concentrations associated with human seizures inhibit glycine receptors.

Lecker I, Wang DS, Romaschin AD, Peterson M, Mazer CD, Orser BA.

J Clin Invest. 2012 Dec;122(12):4654-66. doi: 10.1172/JCI63375. Epub 2012 Nov 26.

2.

Tranexamic acid impairs γ-aminobutyric acid receptor type A-mediated synaptic transmission in the murine amygdala: a potential mechanism for drug-induced seizures?

Kratzer S, Irl H, Mattusch C, Bürge M, Kurz J, Kochs E, Eder M, Rammes G, Haseneder R.

Anesthesiology. 2014 Mar;120(3):639-49. doi: 10.1097/ALN.0000000000000103.

PMID:
24335749
3.

Understanding the TXA seizure connection.

Schwinn DA, Mackensen GB, Brown EN.

J Clin Invest. 2012 Dec;122(12):4339-41. doi: 10.1172/JCI66724. Epub 2012 Nov 26.

4.

Tranexamic acid evokes pain by modulating neuronal excitability in the spinal dorsal horn.

Ohashi N, Sasaki M, Ohashi M, Kamiya Y, Baba H, Kohno T.

Sci Rep. 2015 Aug 21;5:13458. doi: 10.1038/srep13458.

5.

Aprotinin, but not ε-aminocaproic acid and tranexamic acid, exerts neuroprotection against excitotoxic injury in an in vitro neuronal cell culture model.

Lu Z, Korotcova L, Murata A, Ishibashi N, Jonas RA.

J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 2014 Jun;147(6):1939-45. doi: 10.1016/j.jtcvs.2013.09.054. Epub 2013 Nov 13.

6.

Comparison of epsilon aminocaproic acid and tranexamic Acid in thoracic aortic surgery: clinical efficacy and safety.

Makhija N, Sarupria A, Kumar Choudhary S, Das S, Lakshmy R, Kiran U.

J Cardiothorac Vasc Anesth. 2013 Dec;27(6):1201-7. doi: 10.1053/j.jvca.2013.04.003. Epub 2013 Sep 17.

PMID:
24050855
7.
8.

[Mechanisms of interactions between glycine- and GABA-mediated responses in spinal cord neurons].

Amakhin DB, Veselkin NP.

Ross Fiziol Zh Im I M Sechenova. 2011 Oct;97(10):1025-34. Russian.

PMID:
22292269
9.

Tranexamic acid versus ɛ-aminocaproic acid: efficacy and safety in paediatric cardiac surgery.

Martin K, Breuer T, Gertler R, Hapfelmeier A, Schreiber C, Lange R, Hess J, Wiesner G.

Eur J Cardiothorac Surg. 2011 Jun;39(6):892-7. doi: 10.1016/j.ejcts.2010.09.041. Epub 2010 Nov 5.

PMID:
21115357
10.

Tranexamic acid, a widely used antifibrinolytic agent, causes convulsions by a gamma-aminobutyric acid(A) receptor antagonistic effect.

Furtmüller R, Schlag MG, Berger M, Hopf R, Huck S, Sieghart W, Redl H.

J Pharmacol Exp Ther. 2002 Apr;301(1):168-73.

11.

Aminocaproic acid and tranexamic acid increase the rate of acute corneal reepithelialization in Sprague Dawley rats.

Crouch ER 3rd, Crouch ER Jr, Williams PB.

J Ocul Pharmacol Ther. 1998 Apr;14(2):109-18.

PMID:
9572536
12.

The role of gamma-aminobutyric acid/glycinergic synaptic transmission in mediating bilirubin-induced hyperexcitation in developing auditory neurons.

Yin XL, Liang M, Shi HB, Wang LY, Li CY, Yin SK.

Toxicol Lett. 2016 Jan 5;240(1):1-9. doi: 10.1016/j.toxlet.2015.10.008. Epub 2015 Oct 21.

PMID:
26476400
13.
14.

Opposing actions of sevoflurane on GABAergic and glycinergic synaptic inhibition in the spinal ventral horn.

Eckle VS, Hauser S, Drexler B, Antkowiak B, Grasshoff C.

PLoS One. 2013;8(4):e60286. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0060286. Epub 2013 Apr 2.

16.

Seizures after open heart surgery: comparison of ε-aminocaproic acid and tranexamic acid.

Martin K, Knorr J, Breuer T, Gertler R, Macguill M, Lange R, Tassani P, Wiesner G.

J Cardiothorac Vasc Anesth. 2011 Feb;25(1):20-5. doi: 10.1053/j.jvca.2010.10.007.

PMID:
21272777
18.

High-dose tranexamic acid is related to increased risk of generalized seizures after aortic valve replacement.

Keyl C, Uhl R, Beyersdorf F, Stampf S, Lehane C, Wiesenack C, Trenk D.

Eur J Cardiothorac Surg. 2011 May;39(5):e114-21. doi: 10.1016/j.ejcts.2010.12.030. Epub 2011 Feb 4.

PMID:
21295991
19.

The anesthetic-like effects of diverse compounds on wild-type and mutant gamma-aminobutyric acid type A and glycine receptors.

Yang L, Sonner JM.

Anesth Analg. 2008 Mar;106(3):838-45, table of contents. doi: 10.1213/ane.0b013e31816095bd.

PMID:
18292428
20.

Glycine receptors involved in synaptic transmission are selectively regulated by the cytoskeleton in mouse spinal neurons.

van Zundert B, Alvarez FJ, Yevenes GE, Cárcamo JG, Vera JC, Aguayo LG.

J Neurophysiol. 2002 Jan;87(1):640-4.

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