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Items: 1 to 20 of 101

1.

The predictive value of self-report questions in a clinical decision rule for pediatric lead poisoning screening.

Kaplowitz SA, Perlstadt H, D'Onofrio G, Melnick ER, Baum CR, Kirrane BM, Post LA.

Public Health Rep. 2012 Jul-Aug;127(4):375-82.

2.

Comparing lead poisoning risk assessment methods: census block group characteristics vs. zip codes as predictors.

Kaplowitz SA, Perlstadt H, Perlstadt H, Post LA.

Public Health Rep. 2010 Mar-Apr;125(2):234-45.

3.

Recommendations for blood lead screening of Medicaid-eligible children aged 1-5 years: an updated approach to targeting a group at high risk.

Wengrovitz AM, Brown MJ; Advisory Committee on Childhood Lead Poisoning, Division of Environmental and Emergency Health Services, National Center for Environmental Health; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

MMWR Recomm Rep. 2009 Aug 7;58(RR-9):1-11.

4.

Evaluation of risk assessment questions used to target blood lead screening in Illinois.

Binns HJ, LeBailly SA, Fingar AR, Saunders S.

Pediatrics. 1999 Jan;103(1):100-6.

PMID:
9917446
5.
6.

Is there lead in the suburbs? Risk assessment in Chicago suburban pediatric practices. Pediatric Practice Research Group.

Binns HJ, LeBailly SA, Poncher J, Kinsella TR, Saunders SE.

Pediatrics. 1994 Feb;93(2):164-71.

PMID:
8121725
7.

Do questions about lead exposure predict elevated lead levels?

Tejeda DM, Wyatt DD, Rostek BR, Solomon WB.

Pediatrics. 1994 Feb;93(2):192-4.

PMID:
8121730
8.

Lead poisoning risk determination in an urban population through the use of a standardized questionnaire.

Schaffer SJ, Szilagyi PG, Weitzman M.

Pediatrics. 1994 Feb;93(2):159-63.

PMID:
8121724
9.
10.

Validation and Assessment of Pediatric Lead Screener Questions for Primary Prevention of Lead Exposure.

Nicholson JS, Cleeton M.

Clin Pediatr (Phila). 2016 Feb;55(2):129-36. doi: 10.1177/0009922815584944. Epub 2015 May 18.

PMID:
25986443
11.

Efforts to identify at-risk children for blood lead screening in pediatric clinics--Clark County, Nevada.

Burns MS, Shah LH, Marquez ER, Denton SL, Neyland BA, Vereschzagin D, Gremse DA, Gerstenberger SL.

Clin Pediatr (Phila). 2012 Nov;51(11):1048-55. doi: 10.1177/0009922812458352. Epub 2012 Aug 30.

PMID:
22935218
12.

Primary prevention of childhood lead poisoning through community outreach.

Schlenker TL, Baxmann R, McAvoy P, Bartkowski J, Murphy A.

WMJ. 2001;100(8):48-54.

PMID:
12685297
13.

Prevalence of lead poisoning in a suburban practice.

Striph KB.

J Fam Pract. 1995 Jul;41(1):65-71.

PMID:
7798067
14.
15.
17.

Screening for Elevated Blood Lead Levels in Children: Assessment of Criteria and a Proposal for New Ones in France.

Etchevers A, Glorennec P, Le Strat Y, Lecoffre C, Bretin P, Le Tertre A.

Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2015 Dec 3;12(12):15366-78. doi: 10.3390/ijerph121214989.

19.

The accuracy of a lead questionnaire in predicting elevated pediatric blood lead levels.

France EK, Gitterman BA, Melinkovich P, Wright RA.

Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 1996 Sep;150(9):958-63.

PMID:
8790128
20.

Interpreting and managing blood lead levels < 10 microg/dL in children and reducing childhood exposures to lead: recommendations of CDC's Advisory Committee on Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Advisory Committee on Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention.

MMWR Recomm Rep. 2007 Nov 2;56(RR-8):1-16. Erratum in: MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2007 Nov 30;56(47):1241.

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