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Items: 1 to 20 of 76

1.

Impact of dust from multiple microenvironments and diet on PentaBDE body burden.

Watkins DJ, McClean MD, Fraser AJ, Weinberg J, Stapleton HM, Sjödin A, Webster TF.

Environ Sci Technol. 2012 Jan 17;46(2):1192-200. doi: 10.1021/es203314e. Epub 2011 Dec 20.

2.

Exposure to PBDEs in the office environment: evaluating the relationships between dust, handwipes, and serum.

Watkins DJ, McClean MD, Fraser AJ, Weinberg J, Stapleton HM, Sjödin A, Webster TF.

Environ Health Perspect. 2011 Sep;119(9):1247-52. doi: 10.1289/ehp.1003271. Epub 2011 Jun 30.

3.

Serum PBDEs in a North Carolina toddler cohort: associations with handwipes, house dust, and socioeconomic variables.

Stapleton HM, Eagle S, Sjödin A, Webster TF.

Environ Health Perspect. 2012 Jul;120(7):1049-54. doi: 10.1289/ehp.1104802. Epub 2012 May 23.

4.

Urinary tetrabromobenzoic acid (TBBA) as a biomarker of exposure to the flame retardant mixture Firemaster® 550.

Hoffman K, Fang M, Horman B, Patisaul HB, Garantziotis S, Birnbaum LS, Stapleton HM.

Environ Health Perspect. 2014 Sep;122(9):963-9. doi: 10.1289/ehp.1308028. Epub 2014 May 13.

5.

Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in the indoor environment and associations with prenatal exposure.

Vorkamp K, Thomsen M, Frederiksen M, Pedersen M, Knudsen LE.

Environ Int. 2011 Jan;37(1):1-10. doi: 10.1016/j.envint.2010.06.001. Epub 2010 Jul 6.

PMID:
20609475
6.

Concentrations of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in matched samples of human milk, dust and indoor air.

Toms LM, Hearn L, Kennedy K, Harden F, Bartkow M, Temme C, Mueller JF.

Environ Int. 2009 Aug;35(6):864-9. doi: 10.1016/j.envint.2009.03.001. Epub 2009 Apr 5.

PMID:
19351571
7.

Critical factors in assessing exposure to PBDEs via house dust.

Allen JG, McClean MD, Stapleton HM, Webster TF.

Environ Int. 2008 Nov;34(8):1085-91. doi: 10.1016/j.envint.2008.03.006. Epub 2008 May 5.

PMID:
18456330
8.

Insights into PBDE Uptake, Body Burden, and Elimination Gained from Australian Age-Concentration Trends Observed Shortly after Peak Exposure.

Gyalpo T, Toms LM, Mueller JF, Harden FA, Scheringer M, Hungerbühler K.

Environ Health Perspect. 2015 Oct;123(10):978-84. doi: 10.1289/ehp.1408960. Epub 2015 Mar 13.

9.

Polyfluorinated compounds in dust from homes, offices, and vehicles as predictors of concentrations in office workers' serum.

Fraser AJ, Webster TF, Watkins DJ, Strynar MJ, Kato K, Calafat AM, Vieira VM, McClean MD.

Environ Int. 2013 Oct;60:128-36. doi: 10.1016/j.envint.2013.08.012. Epub 2013 Sep 14.

10.

Estimated intakes of brominated flame retardants via diet and dust compared to internal concentrations in a Swedish mother-toddler cohort.

Sahlström LM, Sellström U, de Wit CA, Lignell S, Darnerud PO.

Int J Hyg Environ Health. 2015 Jun;218(4):422-32. doi: 10.1016/j.ijheh.2015.03.011. Epub 2015 Mar 26.

PMID:
25850971
11.

A comparative assessment of human exposure to tetrabromobisphenol A and eight bisphenols including bisphenol A via indoor dust ingestion in twelve countries.

Wang W, Abualnaja KO, Asimakopoulos AG, Covaci A, Gevao B, Johnson-Restrepo B, Kumosani TA, Malarvannan G, Minh TB, Moon HB, Nakata H, Sinha RK, Kannan K.

Environ Int. 2015 Oct;83:183-91. doi: 10.1016/j.envint.2015.06.015. Epub 2015 Jul 10.

PMID:
26177148
12.

Polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) levels in dust from previously owned automobiles at United States dealerships.

Lagalante AF, Oswald TD, Calvosa FC.

Environ Int. 2009 Apr;35(3):539-44. doi: 10.1016/j.envint.2008.09.011. Epub 2008 Nov 20.

PMID:
19019437
13.

Diet contributes significantly to the body burden of PBDEs in the general U.S. population.

Fraser AJ, Webster TF, McClean MD.

Environ Health Perspect. 2009 Oct;117(10):1520-5. doi: 10.1289/ehp.0900817. Epub 2009 Jun 18.

14.

Lead consumption of 18- to 36-month-old children as determined from duplicate diet collections: nutrient intakes, blood lead levels, and effects on growth.

Stanek K, Manton W, Angle C, Eskridge K, Kuehneman A, Hanson C.

J Am Diet Assoc. 1998 Feb;98(2):155-8.

PMID:
12515415
15.

Is house dust the missing exposure pathway for PBDEs? An analysis of the urban fate and human exposure to PBDEs.

Jones-Otazo HA, Clarke JP, Diamond ML, Archbold JA, Ferguson G, Harner T, Richardson GM, Ryan JJ, Wilford B.

Environ Sci Technol. 2005 Jul 15;39(14):5121-30.

PMID:
16082939
16.

Concentrations of polybromobiphenyls and polybromodiphenyl ethers in home dust: relevance to socio-economic status and human exposure rate.

Kefeni KK, Okonkwo JO, Botha BM.

Sci Total Environ. 2014 Feb 1;470-471:1250-6. doi: 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2013.10.078. Epub 2013 Nov 16.

PMID:
24252199
17.

Human exposure to polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDE), as evidenced by data from a duplicate diet study, indoor air, house dust, and biomonitoring in Germany.

Fromme H, Körner W, Shahin N, Wanner A, Albrecht M, Boehmer S, Parlar H, Mayer R, Liebl B, Bolte G.

Environ Int. 2009 Nov;35(8):1125-35. doi: 10.1016/j.envint.2009.07.003. Epub 2009 Aug 6.

PMID:
19664822
18.

Changes in manganese and lead in the environment and young children associated with the introduction of methylcyclopentadienyl manganese tricarbonyl in gasoline--preliminary results.

Gulson B, Mizon K, Taylor A, Korsch M, Stauber J, Davis JM, Louie H, Wu M, Swan H.

Environ Res. 2006 Jan;100(1):100-14.

PMID:
16337847
19.

Exposure of Americans to polybrominated diphenyl ethers.

Lorber M.

J Expo Sci Environ Epidemiol. 2008 Jan;18(1):2-19. Epub 2007 Apr 11. Review.

PMID:
17426733
20.

Comparing human exposure to emerging and legacy flame retardants from the indoor environment and diet with concentrations measured in serum.

Cequier E, Marcé RM, Becher G, Thomsen C.

Environ Int. 2015 Jan;74:54-9. doi: 10.1016/j.envint.2014.10.003. Epub 2014 Oct 17.

PMID:
25454220

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