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Items: 1 to 20 of 149

1.

Are soft drink taxes an effective mechanism for reducing obesity?

Fletcher JM, Frisvold DE, Tefft N.

J Policy Anal Manage. 2011 Summer;30(3):655-62. No abstract available.

PMID:
21774173
2.

Commentary: Soda taxes, obesity, and the shifty behavior of consumers.

Edwards RD.

Prev Med. 2011 Jun;52(6):417-8. doi: 10.1016/j.ypmed.2011.04.011. Epub 2011 Apr 23.

PMID:
21539854
3.

[Healthy nutrition: steering with taxes?].

Weiss J.

Dtsch Med Wochenschr. 2010 Aug;135(34-35):p30. German. No abstract available.

PMID:
20803816
4.

Improving nutrition for better oral health.

Somborac M.

J Can Dent Assoc. 2010;76:a131. No abstract available.

5.

Ounces of prevention--the public policy case for taxes on sugared beverages.

Brownell KD, Frieden TR.

N Engl J Med. 2009 Apr 30;360(18):1805-8. doi: 10.1056/NEJMp0902392. Epub 2009 Apr 8. No abstract available.

6.

Sweetened drinks and children's health--what do we know, and what can we do?

Robertson J.

Diabetes Technol Ther. 2003;5(2):201-3. No abstract available.

PMID:
12871610
7.

"Fat taxes" and the financial crisis.

McColl K.

Lancet. 2009 Mar 7;373(9666):797-8. No abstract available.

PMID:
19278032
8.

Stop drinking soda? How this beverage could affect your health.

[No authors listed]

Mayo Clin Womens Healthsource. 2010 Aug;14(8):1-2. No abstract available.

PMID:
20616775
9.

Soft drinks industry accuses doctors of having financial interest in pushing for sugar tax.

Torjesen I.

BMJ. 2015 Dec 14;351:h6779. doi: 10.1136/bmj.h6779. No abstract available.

PMID:
26670736
10.

The price of soft drinks.

Shue BK.

J Calif Dent Assoc. 2009 Nov;37(11):757-8. No abstract available.

PMID:
19998650
11.

The real thing.

Mashman W.

JACC Cardiovasc Interv. 2010 May;3(5):568-9. doi: 10.1016/j.jcin.2010.03.010. No abstract available.

12.

Food prices and obesity: evidence and policy implications for taxes and subsidies.

Powell LM, Chaloupka FJ.

Milbank Q. 2009 Mar;87(1):229-57. doi: 10.1111/j.1468-0009.2009.00554.x. Review.

13.

[Specific purchase tax on sweetened beverages--are we there soon?].

Marcus C, Rössner S.

Lakartidningen. 2011 Feb 2-8;108(5):188-9. Swedish. No abstract available.

PMID:
21384614
14.

Twenty percent tax on fizzy drinks could save lives and generate millions in revenue for health programmes in New Zealand.

Ni Mhurchu C, Eyles H, Genc M, Blakely T.

N Z Med J. 2014 Feb 14;127(1389):92-5. No abstract available.

PMID:
24548963
15.

Associations between state-level soda taxes and adolescent body mass index.

Powell LM, Chriqui J, Chaloupka FJ.

J Adolesc Health. 2009 Sep;45(3 Suppl):S57-63. doi: 10.1016/j.jadohealth.2009.03.003. Epub 2009 Jun 16.

PMID:
19699437
16.

Empirical evidence of the efficiency and efficacy of fat taxes and thin subsidies.

Clark JS, Dittrich LO, Xu Q.

Cent Eur J Public Health. 2014 Sep;22(3):201-6.

17.

Soft drink consumption and caries risk in children and adolescents.

Shenkin JD, Heller KE, Warren JJ, Marshall TA.

Gen Dent. 2003 Jan-Feb;51(1):30-6. Review.

PMID:
15061331
18.

Obesity: from public health to public policy: an interview with Marlene Schwartz, PhD.

Schwartz M, Gerhard DM, Monsey MS.

Yale J Biol Med. 2014 Jun 6;87(2):167-71. eCollection 2014 Jun. No abstract available.

19.

Soda tax win brings hope to diabesity campaigners.

Messenger A.

Public Health Res Pract. 2014 Nov 28;25(1). pii: 2511412. doi: 10.17061/phrp2511412. No abstract available.

20.

Advanced policy options to regulate sugar-sweetened beverages to support public health.

Pomeranz JL.

J Public Health Policy. 2012 Feb;33(1):75-88. doi: 10.1057/jphp.2011.46. Epub 2011 Aug 25. Review.

PMID:
21866177

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