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Items: 1 to 20 of 108

1.

A novel unstable duplication upstream of HAS2 predisposes to a breed-defining skin phenotype and a periodic fever syndrome in Chinese Shar-Pei dogs.

Olsson M, Meadows JR, Truvé K, Rosengren Pielberg G, Puppo F, Mauceli E, Quilez J, Tonomura N, Zanna G, Docampo MJ, Bassols A, Avery AC, Karlsson EK, Thomas A, Kastner DL, Bongcam-Rudloff E, Webster MT, Sanchez A, Hedhammar A, Remmers EF, Andersson L, Ferrer L, Tintle L, Lindblad-Toh K.

PLoS Genet. 2011 Mar;7(3):e1001332. doi: 10.1371/journal.pgen.1001332. Epub 2011 Mar 17.

2.

Hereditary cutaneous mucinosis in shar pei dogs is associated with increased hyaluronan synthase-2 mRNA transcription by cultured dermal fibroblasts.

Zanna G, Docampo MJ, Fondevila D, Bardagí M, Bassols A, Ferrer L.

Vet Dermatol. 2009 Oct;20(5-6):377-82. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-3164.2009.00799.x.

PMID:
20178474
3.

Increased HAS2-driven hyaluronic acid synthesis in shar-pei dogs with hereditary cutaneous hyaluronosis (mucinosis).

Docampo MJ, Zanna G, Fondevila D, Cabrera J, López-Iglesias C, Carvalho A, Cerrato S, Ferrer L, Bassols A.

Vet Dermatol. 2011 Dec;22(6):535-45. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-3164.2011.00986.x. Epub 2011 Jul 1.

PMID:
21718367
4.

A study of Shar-Pei dogs refutes association of the 'meatmouth' duplication near HAS2 with Familial Shar-Pei Fever.

Metzger J, Distl O.

Anim Genet. 2014 Oct;45(5):763-4. doi: 10.1111/age.12193. Epub 2014 Jul 5. No abstract available.

PMID:
25040095
5.

Cutaneous mucinosis in shar-pei dogs is due to hyaluronic acid deposition and is associated with high levels of hyaluronic acid in serum.

Zanna G, Fondevila D, Bardagí M, Docampo MJ, Bassols A, Ferrer L.

Vet Dermatol. 2008 Oct;19(5):314-8. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-3164.2008.00703.x. Epub 2008 Sep 10.

PMID:
18786151
6.

Chinese Shar-Pei dogs: a model for human Mediterranean fever?

Hayem G.

Joint Bone Spine. 2013 Jul;80(4):353-4. doi: 10.1016/j.jbspin.2013.03.008. Epub 2013 Apr 23. No abstract available.

PMID:
23622734
7.

Thorough investigation of a canine autoinflammatory disease (AID) confirms one main risk locus and suggests a modifier locus for amyloidosis.

Olsson M, Tintle L, Kierczak M, Perloski M, Tonomura N, Lundquist A, Murén E, Fels M, Tengvall K, Pielberg G, Dufaure de Citres C, Dorso L, Abadie J, Hanson J, Thomas A, Leegwater P, Hedhammar Å, Lindblad-Toh K, Meadows JR.

PLoS One. 2013 Oct 9;8(10):e75242. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0075242. eCollection 2013.

8.

Whole genome sequencing identifies missense mutation in MTBP in Shar-Pei affected with Autoinflammatory Disease (SPAID).

Metzger J, Nolte A, Uhde AK, Hewicker-Trautwein M, Distl O.

BMC Genomics. 2017 May 4;18(1):348. doi: 10.1186/s12864-017-3737-z.

9.

A new disorder of hyaluronan metabolism associated with generalized folding and thickening of the skin.

Ramsden CA, Bankier A, Brown TJ, Cowen PS, Frost GI, McCallum DD, Studdert VP, Fraser JR.

J Pediatr. 2000 Jan;136(1):62-8.

PMID:
10636976
10.

Tracking footprints of artificial selection in the dog genome.

Akey JM, Ruhe AL, Akey DT, Wong AK, Connelly CF, Madeoy J, Nicholas TJ, Neff MW.

Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2010 Jan 19;107(3):1160-5. doi: 10.1073/pnas.0909918107. Epub 2010 Jan 11.

11.

Hepatic amyloidosis in two Chinese Shar Pei dogs.

Loeven KO.

J Am Vet Med Assoc. 1994 Apr 15;204(8):1212-6.

PMID:
8014090
12.

Skin diseases of the Chinese Shar-Pei.

Muller GH.

Vet Clin North Am Small Anim Pract. 1990 Nov;20(6):1655-70. Review.

PMID:
2251744
13.

Genome-Wide Analyses Suggest Mechanisms Involving Early B-Cell Development in Canine IgA Deficiency.

Olsson M, Tengvall K, Frankowiack M, Kierczak M, Bergvall K, Axelsson E, Tintle L, Marti E, Roosje P, Leeb T, Hedhammar Å, Hammarström L, Lindblad-Toh K.

PLoS One. 2015 Jul 30;10(7):e0133844. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0133844. eCollection 2015. Erratum in: PLoS One. 2015;10(9):e0138405.

14.

Quantitative study of 'flame follicles' in skin sections of Shar-pei dogs.

Ordeix L, Fondevila D, Ferrer L, Fondati A.

Vet Dermatol. 2002 Oct;13(5):261-5.

PMID:
12358610
15.

Serum homocysteine and methylmalonic acid concentrations in Chinese Shar-Pei dogs with cobalamin deficiency.

Grützner N, Heilmann RM, Stupka KC, Rangachari VR, Weber K, Holzenburg A, Suchodolski JS, Steiner JM.

Vet J. 2013 Aug;197(2):420-6. doi: 10.1016/j.tvjl.2013.02.002. Epub 2013 Mar 15.

PMID:
23499543
16.

Assessment of the functionality of genome-wide canine SNP arrays and implications for canine disease association studies.

Ke X, Kennedy LJ, Short AD, Seppälä EH, Barnes A, Clements DN, Wood SH, Carter SD, Happ GM, Lohi H, Ollier WE.

Anim Genet. 2011 Apr;42(2):181-90. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2052.2010.02132.x. Epub 2010 Nov 11.

PMID:
21070295
17.

Chinese shar pei fever syndrome: a preliminary report.

May C, Hammill J, Bennett D.

Vet Rec. 1992 Dec 19-26;131(25-26):586-7. No abstract available.

PMID:
1287956
18.

Association study of cobalamin deficiency in the Chinese Shar Pei.

Grützner N, Bishop MA, Suchodolski JS, Steiner JM.

J Hered. 2010 Mar-Apr;101(2):211-7. doi: 10.1093/jhered/esp100. Epub 2009 Nov 19.

PMID:
19926684
19.

A novel locus on canine chromosome 13 is associated with cataract in the Australian Shepherd breed of domestic dog.

Ricketts SL, Pettitt L, McLaughlin B, Jenkins CA, Mellersh CS.

Mamm Genome. 2015 Jun;26(5-6):257-63. doi: 10.1007/s00335-015-9562-2. Epub 2015 Apr 19.

PMID:
25894238
20.

Acute febrile neutrophilic vasculitis of the skin of young Shar-Pei dogs.

Malik R, Foster SF, Martin P, Canfield PJ, Mason KV, Bosward KL, Gough A, Rippon G.

Aust Vet J. 2002 Apr;80(4):200-6.

PMID:
12054281

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