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Items: 1 to 20 of 112

1.

Modeling neurodegenerative disease pathophysiology in thiamine deficiency: consequences of impaired oxidative metabolism.

Jhala SS, Hazell AS.

Neurochem Int. 2011 Feb;58(3):248-60. doi: 10.1016/j.neuint.2010.11.019. Review.

PMID:
21130821
2.

Astrocytes are a major target in thiamine deficiency and Wernicke's encephalopathy.

Hazell AS.

Neurochem Int. 2009 Jul-Aug;55(1-3):129-35. doi: 10.1016/j.neuint.2009.02.020. Review.

PMID:
19428817
3.

Update of cell damage mechanisms in thiamine deficiency: focus on oxidative stress, excitotoxicity and inflammation.

Hazell AS, Butterworth RF.

Alcohol Alcohol. 2009 Mar-Apr;44(2):141-7. doi: 10.1093/alcalc/agn120. Review.

PMID:
19151161
4.

Oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and cellular stress response in Friedreich's ataxia.

Calabrese V, Lodi R, Tonon C, D'Agata V, Sapienza M, Scapagnini G, Mangiameli A, Pennisi G, Stella AM, Butterfield DA.

J Neurol Sci. 2005 Jun 15;233(1-2):145-62. Review.

PMID:
15896810
5.

Accumulation of amyloid precursor protein-like immunoreactivity in rat brain in response to thiamine deficiency.

Calingasan NY, Gandy SE, Baker H, Sheu KF, Kim KS, Wisniewski HM, Gibson GE.

Brain Res. 1995 Apr 17;677(1):50-60.

PMID:
7606469
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eNOS gene deletion restores blood-brain barrier integrity and attenuates neurodegeneration in the thiamine-deficient mouse brain.

Beauchesne E, Desjardins P, Hazell AS, Butterworth RF.

J Neurochem. 2009 Oct;111(2):452-9. doi: 10.1111/j.1471-4159.2009.06338.x.

9.

CD40-CD40L interactions promote neuronal death in a model of neurodegeneration due to mild impairment of oxidative metabolism.

Ke ZJ, Calingasan NY, DeGiorgio LA, Volpe BT, Gibson GE.

Neurochem Int. 2005 Aug;47(3):204-15.

PMID:
15885854
10.

Up-regulation of caveolin-1 and blood-brain barrier breakdown are attenuated by N-acetylcysteine in thiamine deficiency.

Beauchesne E, Desjardins P, Butterworth RF, Hazell AS.

Neurochem Int. 2010 Dec;57(7):830-7. doi: 10.1016/j.neuint.2010.08.022.

PMID:
20816907
11.

Thiamine deficiency: an update of pathophysiologic mechanisms and future therapeutic considerations.

Abdou E, Hazell AS.

Neurochem Res. 2015 Feb;40(2):353-61. doi: 10.1007/s11064-014-1430-z. Review.

PMID:
25297573
12.

Thiamine deficiency during pregnancy leads to cerebellar neuronal death in rat offspring: role of voltage-dependent K+ channels.

Oliveira FA, Galan DT, Ribeiro AM, Santos Cruz J.

Brain Res. 2007 Feb 23;1134(1):79-86.

PMID:
17196946
13.

In vivo and in vitro proton NMR spectroscopic studies of thiamine-deficient rat brains.

Lee H, Holburn GE, Price RR.

J Magn Reson Imaging. 2001 Feb;13(2):163-6.

PMID:
11169820
14.

Role of astrocytes in thiamine deficiency.

Afadlal S, Labetoulle R, Hazell AS.

Metab Brain Dis. 2014 Dec;29(4):1061-8. doi: 10.1007/s11011-014-9571-y. Review.

PMID:
24929329
15.

Microglial activation is a major contributor to neurologic dysfunction in thiamine deficiency.

Wang D, Hazell AS.

Biochem Biophys Res Commun. 2010 Nov 5;402(1):123-8. doi: 10.1016/j.bbrc.2010.09.128.

PMID:
20932820
16.

Senescence accelerated mouse strain is sensitive to neurodegeneration induced by mild impairment of oxidative metabolism.

Zhang Q, Ding H, Li W, Fan Z, Sun A, Luo J, Ke ZJ.

Brain Res. 2009 Apr 6;1264:111-8. doi: 10.1016/j.brainres.2009.02.005.

PMID:
19232329
17.
18.

Mitochondria, metabolic disturbances, oxidative stress and the kynurenine system, with focus on neurodegenerative disorders.

Sas K, Robotka H, Toldi J, VĂ©csei L.

J Neurol Sci. 2007 Jun 15;257(1-2):221-39. Review.

PMID:
17462670
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