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Items: 1 to 20 of 131

1.

Effectiveness of morphine, fentanyl, and methoxyflurane in the prehospital setting.

Middleton PM, Simpson PM, Sinclair G, Dobbins TA, Math B, Bendall JC.

Prehosp Emerg Care. 2010 Oct-Dec;14(4):439-47. doi: 10.3109/10903127.2010.497896.

PMID:
20809687
2.

Effectiveness of prehospital morphine, fentanyl, and methoxyflurane in pediatric patients.

Bendall JC, Simpson PM, Middleton PM.

Prehosp Emerg Care. 2011 Apr-Jun;15(2):158-65. doi: 10.3109/10903127.2010.541980.

PMID:
21294628
3.

Prehospital analgesia in New South Wales, Australia.

Bendall JC, Simpson PM, Middleton PM.

Prehosp Disaster Med. 2011 Dec;26(6):422-6. doi: 10.1017/S1049023X12000180.

PMID:
22559307
4.

Inhaled methoxyflurane and intranasal fentanyl for prehospital management of visceral pain in an Australian ambulance service.

Johnston S, Wilkes GJ, Thompson JA, Ziman M, Brightwell R.

Emerg Med J. 2011 Jan;28(1):57-63. doi: 10.1136/emj.2009.078717.

PMID:
20466829
5.

A randomized controlled trial of intranasal fentanyl vs intravenous morphine for analgesia in the prehospital setting.

Rickard C, O'Meara P, McGrail M, Garner D, McLean A, Le Lievre P.

Am J Emerg Med. 2007 Oct;25(8):911-7.

PMID:
17920976
6.
7.

Analysis of the paramedic administration of fentanyl.

Garrick JF, Kidane S, Pointer JE, Sugiyama W, Van Luen C, Clark R.

J Opioid Manag. 2011 May-Jun;7(3):229-34.

PMID:
21823553
8.

Safety and effectiveness of fentanyl administration for prehospital pain management.

Kanowitz A, Dunn TM, Kanowitz EM, Dunn WW, Vanbuskirk K.

Prehosp Emerg Care. 2006 Jan-Mar;10(1):1-7.

PMID:
16418084
9.
10.

A randomised crossover trial of patient controlled intranasal fentanyl and oral morphine for procedural wound care in adult patients with burns.

Finn J, Wright J, Fong J, Mackenzie E, Wood F, Leslie G, Gelavis A.

Burns. 2004 May;30(3):262-8.

PMID:
15082356
11.

[Fentanyl by buccal administration. Fifty to hundred times stronger than morphine against pain].

Taeron C.

Rev Infirm. 2002 Sep;(83):47-9. French. No abstract available.

PMID:
12380268
12.

Oral versus intravenous opioid dosing for the initial treatment of acute musculoskeletal pain in the emergency department.

Miner JR, Moore J, Gray RO, Skinner L, Biros MH.

Acad Emerg Med. 2008 Dec;15(12):1234-40. doi: 10.1111/j.1553-2712.2008.00266.x.

13.

Sparing effect of a low dose of intrathecal morphine on fentanyl requirements during spinal surgery: a preliminary clinical investigation in dogs.

Novello L, Corletto F, Rabozzi R, Platt SR.

Vet Surg. 2008 Feb;37(2):153-60. doi: 10.1111/j.1532-950X.2007.00358.x.

PMID:
18251809
14.
15.

Inhaled methoxyflurane as a prehospital analgesic in children.

Babl FE, Jamison SR, Spicer M, Bernard S.

Emerg Med Australas. 2006 Aug;18(4):404-10.

PMID:
16842312
16.

Is there an ideal morphine dose for prehospital treatment of severe acute pain? A randomized, double-blind comparison of 2 doses.

Bounes V, Charpentier S, Houze-Cerfon CH, Bellard C, Ducassé JL.

Am J Emerg Med. 2008 Feb;26(2):148-54. doi: 10.1016/j.ajem.2007.04.020.

PMID:
18272093
17.

The influence of paramedic and patient gender on the administration of analgesics in the out-of-hospital setting.

Lord B, Bendall J, Reinten T.

Prehosp Emerg Care. 2014 Apr-Jun;18(2):195-200. doi: 10.3109/10903127.2013.856502.

PMID:
24401105
18.

Comparison of postoperative pain management using two patient-controlled analgesia methods: nursing perspective.

Lindley P, Pestano CR, Gargiulo K.

J Adv Nurs. 2009 Jul;65(7):1370-80. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2648.2009.04991.x.

PMID:
19456995
19.
20.

Intravenous fentanyl for cancer pain: a "fast titration" protocol for the emergency room.

Soares LG, Martins M, Uchoa R.

J Pain Symptom Manage. 2003 Sep;26(3):876-81.

PMID:
14528871
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