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Items: 1 to 20 of 90

1.

Blue moon neurovirology: the merits of studying rare CNS diseases of viral origin.

O'Donnell LA, Rall GF.

J Neuroimmune Pharmacol. 2010 Sep;5(3):443-55. doi: 10.1007/s11481-010-9200-4. Epub 2010 Apr 24. Review.

PMID:
20419352
2.

Making it to the synapse: measles virus spread in and among neurons.

Young VA, Rall GF.

Curr Top Microbiol Immunol. 2009;330:3-30. Review.

3.

Foxp3+ regulatory T cells control persistence of viral CNS infection.

Reuter D, Sparwasser T, Hünig T, Schneider-Schaulies J.

PLoS One. 2012;7(3):e33989. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0033989. Epub 2012 Mar 20.

4.

Get It through Your Thick Head: Emerging Principles in Neuroimmunology and Neurovirology Redefine Central Nervous System "Immune Privilege".

Solomos AC, Rall GF.

ACS Chem Neurosci. 2016 Apr 20;7(4):435-41. doi: 10.1021/acschemneuro.5b00336. Epub 2016 Feb 18. Review.

PMID:
26854733
5.
6.

Productive measles virus brain infection and apoptosis in CD46 transgenic mice.

Evlashev A, Moyse E, Valentin H, Azocar O, Trescol-Biémont MC, Marie JC, Rabourdin-Combe C, Horvat B.

J Virol. 2000 Feb;74(3):1373-82.

7.

T cell-, interleukin-12-, and gamma interferon-driven viral clearance in measles virus-infected brain tissue.

Stubblefield Park SR, Widness M, Levine AD, Patterson CE.

J Virol. 2011 Apr;85(7):3664-76. doi: 10.1128/JVI.01496-10. Epub 2011 Jan 26.

8.

Measles virus in the CNS: the role of viral and host factors for the establishment and maintenance of a persistent infection.

Schneider-Schaulies J, Niewiesk S, Schneider-Schaulies S, ter Meulen V.

J Neurovirol. 1999 Dec;5(6):613-22. Review. No abstract available.

PMID:
10602402
9.

Borna disease virus and the brain.

Gonzalez-Dunia D, Sauder C, de la Torre JC.

Brain Res Bull. 1997;44(6):647-64. Review.

PMID:
9421127
10.

[Development of antituberculous drugs: current status and future prospects].

Tomioka H, Namba K.

Kekkaku. 2006 Dec;81(12):753-74. Review. Japanese.

PMID:
17240921
11.

Pathogenic aspects of measles virus infections.

Schneider-Schaulies S, ter Meulen V.

Arch Virol Suppl. 1999;15:139-58. Review.

PMID:
10470275
12.

HIV-1-associated central nervous system dysfunction.

Krebs FC, Ross H, McAllister J, Wigdahl B.

Adv Pharmacol. 2000;49:315-85. Review.

PMID:
11013768
14.

Use of a vaccine strain of measles virus genetically engineered to produce carcinoembryonic antigen as a novel therapeutic agent against glioblastoma multiforme.

Phuong LK, Allen C, Peng KW, Giannini C, Greiner S, TenEyck CJ, Mishra PK, Macura SI, Russell SJ, Galanis EC.

Cancer Res. 2003 May 15;63(10):2462-9.

15.

Experimental measles encephalitis in Lewis rats: dissemination of infected neuronal cell subtypes.

Jehmlich U, Ritzer J, Grosche J, Härtig W, Liebert UG.

J Neurovirol. 2013 Oct;19(5):461-70. doi: 10.1007/s13365-013-0199-1. Epub 2013 Aug 31.

PMID:
23996691
16.

Developments in HIV neuropathogenesis.

Rumbaugh JA, Nath A.

Curr Pharm Des. 2006;12(9):1023-44. Review.

PMID:
16515484
17.

HIV-infection of the central nervous system: the tightrope walk of innate immunity.

Speth C, Dierich MP, Sopper S.

Mol Immunol. 2005 Feb;42(2):213-28. Review.

PMID:
15488609
18.

The genetics of autism.

Muhle R, Trentacoste SV, Rapin I.

Pediatrics. 2004 May;113(5):e472-86. Review.

PMID:
15121991
19.

Measles virus infections of the central nervous system.

Liebert UG.

Intervirology. 1997;40(2-3):176-84. Review.

PMID:
9450234
20.

Immunoglobulin g antibody-mediated enhancement of measles virus infection can bypass the protective antiviral immune response.

Iankov ID, Pandey M, Harvey M, Griesmann GE, Federspiel MJ, Russell SJ.

J Virol. 2006 Sep;80(17):8530-40.

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