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Items: 1 to 20 of 114

2.

Fetal DNA methylation of autism spectrum disorders candidate genes: association with spontaneous preterm birth.

Behnia F, Parets SE, Kechichian T, Yin H, Dutta EH, Saade GR, Smith AK, Menon R.

Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2015 Apr;212(4):533.e1-9. doi: 10.1016/j.ajog.2015.02.011. Epub 2015 Feb 14.

PMID:
25687563
3.
4.

Sex hormones in autism: androgens and estrogens differentially and reciprocally regulate RORA, a novel candidate gene for autism.

Sarachana T, Xu M, Wu RC, Hu VW.

PLoS One. 2011 Feb 16;6(2):e17116. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0017116.

5.

Methylomic analysis of monozygotic twins discordant for autism spectrum disorder and related behavioural traits.

Wong CC, Meaburn EL, Ronald A, Price TS, Jeffries AR, Schalkwyk LC, Plomin R, Mill J.

Mol Psychiatry. 2014 Apr;19(4):495-503. doi: 10.1038/mp.2013.41. Epub 2013 Apr 23.

7.

The genetics of autism.

Muhle R, Trentacoste SV, Rapin I.

Pediatrics. 2004 May;113(5):e472-86. Review.

PMID:
15121991
8.
9.

Gene methylation in gastric cancer.

Qu Y, Dang S, Hou P.

Clin Chim Acta. 2013 Sep 23;424:53-65. doi: 10.1016/j.cca.2013.05.002. Epub 2013 May 10. Review.

10.

Promoter hypomethylation of RAR-related orphan receptor α 1 is correlated with unfavorable clinicopathological features in patients with colorectal cancer.

Kano H, Takayama T, Midorikawa Y, Nagase H.

Biosci Trends. 2016 Jul 19;10(3):202-9. doi: 10.5582/bst.2016.01097. Epub 2016 Jun 10.

11.

RORA and Autism in The Isfahan Population: Is There An Epigenetic Relationship.

Salehi M, Kamali E, Karahmadi M, Mousavi SM.

Cell J. 2017 Winter;18(4):540-546. Epub 2016 Sep 26.

12.

Genomic and epigenetic evidence for oxytocin receptor deficiency in autism.

Gregory SG, Connelly JJ, Towers AJ, Johnson J, Biscocho D, Markunas CA, Lintas C, Abramson RK, Wright HH, Ellis P, Langford CF, Worley G, Delong GR, Murphy SK, Cuccaro ML, Persico A, Pericak-Vance MA.

BMC Med. 2009 Oct 22;7:62. doi: 10.1186/1741-7015-7-62.

14.

Gene expression profiling of lymphoblasts from autistic and nonaffected sib pairs: altered pathways in neuronal development and steroid biosynthesis.

Hu VW, Nguyen A, Kim KS, Steinberg ME, Sarachana T, Scully MA, Soldin SJ, Luu T, Lee NH.

PLoS One. 2009 Jun 3;4(6):e5775. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0005775.

15.

Is retinoic acid-related orphan receptor-alpha (RORA) a target for gene-environment interactions contributing to autism?

Hu VW.

Neurotoxicology. 2012 Dec;33(6):1434-5. doi: 10.1016/j.neuro.2012.07.009. Epub 2012 Aug 8. Review.

PMID:
22967355
16.

Analysis of RBFOX1 gene expression in lymphoblastoid cell lines of Italian discordant autism spectrum disorders sib-pairs.

Prandini P, Zusi C, Malerba G, Itan, Pignatti PF, Trabetti E.

Mol Cell Probes. 2014 Oct-Dec;28(5-6):242-5. doi: 10.1016/j.mcp.2014.05.001. Epub 2014 Jun 3.

PMID:
24938762
17.

Exaggerated CpH methylation in the autism-affected brain.

Ellis SE, Gupta S, Moes A, West AB, Arking DE.

Mol Autism. 2017 Feb 17;8:6. doi: 10.1186/s13229-017-0119-y. eCollection 2017.

18.

From genes to environment: using integrative genomics to build a "systems-level" understanding of autism spectrum disorders.

Hu VW.

Child Dev. 2013 Jan-Feb;84(1):89-103. doi: 10.1111/j.1467-8624.2012.01759.x. Epub 2012 Apr 12. Review.

19.

15q11-13 GABAA receptor genes are normally biallelically expressed in brain yet are subject to epigenetic dysregulation in autism-spectrum disorders.

Hogart A, Nagarajan RP, Patzel KA, Yasui DH, Lasalle JM.

Hum Mol Genet. 2007 Mar 15;16(6):691-703. Epub 2007 Mar 5.

20.

[Epigenetics' implication in autism spectrum disorders: A review].

Hamza M, Halayem S, Mrad R, Bourgou S, Charfi F, Belhadj A.

Encephale. 2016 Sep 27. pii: S0013-7006(16)30191-9. doi: 10.1016/j.encep.2016.07.007. [Epub ahead of print] French.

PMID:
27692350

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