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Items: 1 to 20 of 131

1.

A draining lymph node assay (DLNA) for assessing the sensitizing potential of proteins.

Boverhof DR, Gollapudi BB, Hotchkiss JA, Osterloh-Quiroz M, Woolhiser MR.

Toxicol Lett. 2010 Mar 15;193(2):144-51. doi: 10.1016/j.toxlet.2009.12.020.

PMID:
20060446
2.

Contact and respiratory sensitizers can be identified by cytokine profiles following inhalation exposure.

De Jong WH, Arts JH, De Klerk A, Schijf MA, Ezendam J, Kuper CF, Van Loveren H.

Toxicology. 2009 Jul 10;261(3):103-11. doi: 10.1016/j.tox.2009.04.057.

PMID:
19422874
3.
4.

Assessment of the respiratory sensitization potential of proteins using an enhanced mouse intranasal test (MINT).

Krieger SM, Boverhof DR, Woolhiser MR, Hotchkiss JA.

Food Chem Toxicol. 2013 Sep;59:165-76. doi: 10.1016/j.fct.2013.05.037.

PMID:
23747714
5.

Increased cell proliferation in spleen and lymph nodes peripheral to contact allergen application site.

Chipinda I, Anderson SE, Butterworth LF, Beezhold D, Siegel PD.

Toxicology. 2009 Mar 29;257(3):113-6. doi: 10.1016/j.tox.2008.12.019.

PMID:
19150643
6.

Cytokine endpoints for the local lymph node assay: consideration of interferon-gamma and interleukin 12.

Dearman RJ, Hilton J, Basketter DA, Kimber I.

J Appl Toxicol. 1999 May-Jun;19(3):149-55.

PMID:
10362264
7.

Human potency predictions for aldehydes using the local lymph node assay.

Basketter DA, Wright ZM, Warbrick EV, Dearman RJ, Kimber I, Ryan CA, Gerberick GF, White IR.

Contact Dermatitis. 2001 Aug;45(2):89-94.

PMID:
11553118
8.

The respiratory allergen glutaraldehyde in the local lymph node assay: sensitization by skin exposure, but not by inhalation.

van Triel JJ, van Bree BW, Roberts DW, Muijser H, Duistermaat E, Woutersen RA, Kuper CF.

Toxicology. 2011 Jan 11;279(1-3):115-22. doi: 10.1016/j.tox.2010.09.018.

PMID:
20933045
9.

Validity of methods to predict the respiratory sensitizing potential of chemicals: A study with a piperidinyl chlorotriazine derivative that caused an outbreak of occupational asthma.

Vanoirbeek JA, Mandervelt C, Cunningham AR, Hoet PH, Xu H, Vanhooren HM, Nemery B.

Toxicol Sci. 2003 Dec;76(2):338-46.

PMID:
14514965
10.
12.

A sensitive mouse lymph node assay with two application phases for detection of contact allergens.

Ikarashi Y, Tsuchiya T, Nakamura A.

Arch Toxicol. 1993;67(9):629-36.

PMID:
8311690
13.

Use of an ex vivo local lymph node assay to assess contact hypersensitivity potential.

Piccotti JR, Kawabata TT.

J Immunotoxicol. 2008 Jul;5(3):271-7. doi: 10.1080/15376510802311961.

PMID:
18830887
14.

Contact allergenic potency: correlation of human and local lymph node assay data.

Gerberick GF, Robinson MK, Ryan CA, Dearman RJ, Kimber I, Basketter DA, Wright Z, Marks JG.

Am J Contact Dermat. 2001 Sep;12(3):156-61.

PMID:
11526521
15.

Assessment of preferential T-helper 1 or T-helper 2 induction by low molecular weight compounds using the local lymph node assay in conjunction with RT-PCR and ELISA for interferon-gamma and interleukin-4.

Vandebriel RJ, De Jong WH, Spiekstra SW, Van Dijk M, Fluitman A, Garssen J, Van Loveren H.

Toxicol Appl Pharmacol. 2000 Jan 15;162(2):77-85.

PMID:
10637130
17.

Prediction of drug allergenicity: possible use of the local lymph node assay.

Warbrick EV, Dearman RJ, Kimber I.

Curr Opin Drug Discov Devel. 2001 Jan;4(1):60-5. Review.

PMID:
11727324
19.

Anamnestic responses to contact allergens: application in the murine local lymph node assay.

Kimber I, Weisenberger C.

J Appl Toxicol. 1991 Apr;11(2):129-33.

PMID:
2061551
20.

Local lymph node assay: differentiating allergic and irritant responses using flow cytometry.

Gerberick GF, Cruse LW, Ryan CA.

Methods. 1999 Sep;19(1):48-55.

PMID:
10525437

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