Format
Sort by
Items per page

Send to

Choose Destination

Links from PubMed

Items: 1 to 20 of 126

1.

Expectancy and treatment interactions: a dissociation between acupuncture analgesia and expectancy evoked placebo analgesia.

Kong J, Kaptchuk TJ, Polich G, Kirsch I, Vangel M, Zyloney C, Rosen B, Gollub R.

Neuroimage. 2009 Apr 15;45(3):940-9. doi: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2008.12.025. Epub 2008 Dec 29.

2.

An fMRI study on the interaction and dissociation between expectation of pain relief and acupuncture treatment.

Kong J, Kaptchuk TJ, Polich G, Kirsch I, Vangel M, Zyloney C, Rosen B, Gollub RL.

Neuroimage. 2009 Sep;47(3):1066-76. doi: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2009.05.087. Epub 2009 Jun 6.

3.

Brain activity associated with expectancy-enhanced placebo analgesia as measured by functional magnetic resonance imaging.

Kong J, Gollub RL, Rosman IS, Webb JM, Vangel MG, Kirsch I, Kaptchuk TJ.

J Neurosci. 2006 Jan 11;26(2):381-8.

4.

Traditional Chinese acupuncture and placebo (sham) acupuncture are differentiated by their effects on mu-opioid receptors (MORs).

Harris RE, Zubieta JK, Scott DJ, Napadow V, Gracely RH, Clauw DJ.

Neuroimage. 2009 Sep;47(3):1077-85. doi: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2009.05.083. Epub 2009 Jun 6.

5.

Mindfulness Meditation-Based Pain Relief Employs Different Neural Mechanisms Than Placebo and Sham Mindfulness Meditation-Induced Analgesia.

Zeidan F, Emerson NM, Farris SR, Ray JN, Jung Y, McHaffie JG, Coghill RC.

J Neurosci. 2015 Nov 18;35(46):15307-25. doi: 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.2542-15.2015.

6.

Psychophysical outcomes from a randomized pilot study of manual, electro, and sham acupuncture treatment on experimentally induced thermal pain.

Kong J, Fufa DT, Gerber AJ, Rosman IS, Vangel MG, Gracely RH, Gollub RL.

J Pain. 2005 Jan;6(1):55-64.

PMID:
15629419
7.

The contribution of suggestibility and expectation to placebo analgesia phenomenon in an experimental setting.

De Pascalis V, Chiaradia C, Carotenuto E.

Pain. 2002 Apr;96(3):393-402.

PMID:
11973014
8.

When pain is not only pain: inserting needles into the body evokes distinct reward-related brain responses in the context of a treatment.

Lee IS, Wallraven C, Kong J, Chang DS, Lee H, Park HJ, Chae Y.

Physiol Behav. 2015 Mar 1;140:148-55. doi: 10.1016/j.physbeh.2014.12.030. Epub 2014 Dec 17.

PMID:
25528104
9.

The neural substrates of verum acupuncture compared to non-penetrating placebo needle: an fMRI study.

Chae Y, Lee H, Kim H, Sohn H, Park JH, Park HJ.

Neurosci Lett. 2009 Jan 30;450(2):80-4. doi: 10.1016/j.neulet.2008.11.048. Epub 2008 Nov 27.

PMID:
19061937
10.

Distinct neural representations of placebo and nocebo effects.

Freeman S, Yu R, Egorova N, Chen X, Kirsch I, Claggett B, Kaptchuk TJ, Gollub RL, Kong J.

Neuroimage. 2015 May 15;112:197-207. doi: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2015.03.015. Epub 2015 Mar 14.

11.

Are all placebo effects equal? Placebo pills, sham acupuncture, cue conditioning and their association.

Kong J, Spaeth R, Cook A, Kirsch I, Claggett B, Vangel M, Gollub RL, Smoller JW, Kaptchuk TJ.

PLoS One. 2013 Jul 31;8(7):e67485. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0067485. Print 2013.

12.

Neural bases of conditioned placebo analgesia.

Lui F, Colloca L, Duzzi D, Anchisi D, Benedetti F, Porro CA.

Pain. 2010 Dec;151(3):816-24. doi: 10.1016/j.pain.2010.09.021. Epub 2010 Oct 12.

PMID:
20943318
13.

Imaging the functional connectivity of the Periaqueductal Gray during genuine and sham electroacupuncture treatment.

Zyloney CE, Jensen K, Polich G, Loiotile RE, Cheetham A, LaViolette PS, Tu P, Kaptchuk TJ, Gollub RL, Kong J.

Mol Pain. 2010 Nov 16;6:80. doi: 10.1186/1744-8069-6-80.

14.

[Discussion on existing problems of placebo acupuncture design based on acupuncture analgesia].

Mao WC, Liu BY, He LY, Liu ZS, Liu J, Zhao Y.

Zhen Ci Yan Jiu. 2013 Apr;38(2):163-7. Review. Chinese.

PMID:
23819222
15.

Hypnotic susceptibility modulates brain activity related to experimental placebo analgesia.

Huber A, Lui F, Porro CA.

Pain. 2013 Sep;154(9):1509-18. doi: 10.1016/j.pain.2013.03.031. Epub 2013 Mar 28.

PMID:
23664683
16.

A functional magnetic resonance imaging study on the neural mechanisms of hyperalgesic nocebo effect.

Kong J, Gollub RL, Polich G, Kirsch I, Laviolette P, Vangel M, Rosen B, Kaptchuk TJ.

J Neurosci. 2008 Dec 3;28(49):13354-62. doi: 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.2944-08.2008.

17.

Specifying the nonspecific components of acupuncture analgesia.

Vase L, Baram S, Takakura N, Yajima H, Takayama M, Kaptchuk TJ, Schou S, Jensen TS, Zachariae R, Svensson P.

Pain. 2013 Sep;154(9):1659-67. doi: 10.1016/j.pain.2013.05.008. Epub 2013 May 23.

18.

Functional network architecture predicts psychologically mediated analgesia related to treatment in chronic knee pain patients.

Hashmi JA, Kong J, Spaeth R, Khan S, Kaptchuk TJ, Gollub RL.

J Neurosci. 2014 Mar 12;34(11):3924-36. doi: 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.3155-13.2014.

19.

Believe in your placebo.

Seminowicz DA.

J Neurosci. 2006 Apr 26;26(17):4453-4. No abstract available.

20.

Expectancy and belief modulate the neuronal substrates of pain treated by acupuncture.

Pariente J, White P, Frackowiak RS, Lewith G.

Neuroimage. 2005 May 1;25(4):1161-7.

PMID:
15850733

Supplemental Content

Support Center