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Items: 1 to 20 of 124

1.

Child psychiatrists' views of DSM-III-R: a survey of usage and opinions.

Setterberg SR, Ernst M, Rao U, Campbell M, Carlson GA, Shaffer D, Staghezza BM.

J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 1991 Jul;30(4):652-8.

PMID:
1890101
2.

DSM-IV: a nosology sold before its time?

Zimmerman M, Jampala VC, Sierles FS, Taylor MA.

Am J Psychiatry. 1991 Apr;148(4):463-7.

PMID:
2006692
3.

DSM-III and DSM-III-R: what are American psychiatrists using and why?

Zimmerman M, Jampala VC, Sierles FS, Taylor MA.

Compr Psychiatry. 1993 Nov-Dec;34(6):365-74.

PMID:
8131380
4.

International use and attitudes toward DSM-III and DSM-III-R: growing consensus in psychiatric classification.

Maser JD, Kaelber C, Weise RE.

J Abnorm Psychol. 1991 Aug;100(3):271-9.

PMID:
1918604
5.

On the usefulness of the DSM-III-R versus the DSM-III for child psychiatrists.

McConville BJ, Steichen-Asch P.

Can J Psychiatry. 1990 Jun;35(5):367-75. Review.

PMID:
2196984
6.

Consumers' views of DSM-III: attitudes and practices of U.S. psychiatrists and 1984 graduating psychiatric residents.

Jampala VC, Sierles FS, Taylor MA.

Am J Psychiatry. 1986 Feb;143(2):148-53.

PMID:
3946645
7.

Consumers' attitudes toward DSM-III and DSM-III-R: a 1989 survey of psychiatric educators, researchers, practitioners, and senior residents.

Jampala VC, Zimmerman M, Sierles FS, Taylor MA.

Compr Psychiatry. 1992 May-Jun;33(3):180-5.

PMID:
1591909
8.

Is DSM widely accepted by Japanese clinicians?

Someya T, Takahashi M, Takahashi M.

Psychiatry Clin Neurosci. 2001 Oct;55(5):437-50.

9.

[Diagnostic structured interviews in child and adolescent's psychiatry].

Renou S, Hergueta T, Flament M, Mouren-Simeoni MC, Lecrubier Y.

Encephale. 2004 Mar-Apr;30(2):122-34. Review. French.

PMID:
15107714
10.

DSM-III in the training of British psychiatrists: a national survey.

Macaskill N, Geddes J, Macaskill A.

Int J Soc Psychiatry. 1991 Autumn;37(3):182-6.

PMID:
1743902
11.

Correspondence between DSM-III-R and DSM-IV attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

Biederman J, Faraone SV, Weber W, Russell RL, Rater M, Park KS.

J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 1997 Dec;36(12):1682-7.

PMID:
9401329
12.

New Zealand psychiatrists views on global features of ICD-10 and DSM-IV.

Mellsop G, Dutu G, Robinson G.

Aust N Z J Psychiatry. 2007 Feb;41(2):157-65.

PMID:
17464694
13.

Psychiatrists' and nonpsychiatrist physicians' reported use of the DSM-IV criteria for major depressive disorder.

Zimmerman M, Galione J.

J Clin Psychiatry. 2010 Mar;71(3):235-8. doi: 10.4088/JCP.08m04940blu. Epub 2010 Jan 26.

PMID:
20122368
14.

An outsider-insider's views about revising the DSMs.

Spitzer RL.

J Abnorm Psychol. 1991 Aug;100(3):294-6.

PMID:
1918607
15.

Cross system agreement for substance use disorders: DSM-III-R, DSM-IV and ICD-10.

Rounsaville BJ, Bryant K, Babor T, Kranzler H, Kadden R.

Addiction. 1993 Mar;88(3):337-48.

PMID:
8461851
16.

DSM-III in the clinical practice of child psychiatry.

Russell AT, Mattison R, Cantwell DP.

J Clin Psychiatry. 1983 Mar;44(3):86-90.

PMID:
6833193
17.

Pictorial Instrument for Children and Adolescents (PICA-III-R).

Ernst M, Cookus BA, Moravec BC.

J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2000 Jan;39(1):94-9.

PMID:
10638072
18.
19.

[The importance of classifications in psychiatry].

Lempérière T.

Encephale. 1995 Dec;21 Spec No 5:3-7. Review. French.

PMID:
8582303
20.

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