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Items: 1 to 20 of 410

1.

Comparison of the skin sensitizing potential of unsaturated compounds as assessed by the murine local lymph node assay (LLNA) and the guinea pig maximization test (GPMT).

Kreiling R, Hollnagel HM, Hareng L, Eigler D, Lee MS, Griem P, Dreessen B, Kleber M, Albrecht A, Garcia C, Wendel A.

Food Chem Toxicol. 2008 Jun;46(6):1896-904. doi: 10.1016/j.fct.2008.01.019. Epub 2008 Jan 20.

PMID:
18343554
2.
3.

Assessment of the skin sensitization potency of eugenol and its dimers using a non-radioisotopic modification of the local lymph node assay.

Takeyoshi M, Noda S, Yamazaki S, Kakishima H, Yamasaki K, Kimber I.

J Appl Toxicol. 2004 Jan-Feb;24(1):77-81.

PMID:
14745850
4.

Use of the local lymph node assay in the evaluation of the sensitizing potential of pharmaceutical process intermediates.

Durand G, de Burlet G, Virat M, Nauman BD.

Contact Dermatitis. 2003 Sep;49(3):148-54.

PMID:
14678211
5.

Comparison of dose-responses of contact allergens using the guinea pig maximization test and the local lymph node assay.

van Och FM, Vandebriel RJ, Prinsen MK, De Jong WH, Slob W, van Loveren H.

Toxicology. 2001 Oct 30;167(3):207-15. Erratum in: Toxicology 2002 Jan 25;170(3):228-30.

PMID:
11578800
6.
7.

ICCVAM evaluation of the murine local lymph node assay. Conclusions and recommendations of an independent scientific peer review panel.

Dean JH, Twerdok LE, Tice RR, Sailstad DM, Hattan DG, Stokes WS.

Regul Toxicol Pharmacol. 2001 Dec;34(3):258-73.

PMID:
11754530
8.

Local lymph node assay (LLNA) for detection of sensitization capacity of chemicals.

Gerberick GF, Ryan CA, Dearman RJ, Kimber I.

Methods. 2007 Jan;41(1):54-60. Review.

PMID:
16938465
10.

Activity of human contact allergens in the murine local lymph node assay.

Ryan CA, Gerberick GF, Cruse LW, Basketter DA, Lea L, Blaikie L, Dearman RJ, Warbrick EV, Kimber I.

Contact Dermatitis. 2000 Aug;43(2):95-102.

PMID:
10945748
11.

Unsaturated compounds induce up-regulation of CD86 on dendritic cells in the in vitro sensitization assay LCSA.

Frohwein TA, Sonnenburg A, Zuberbier T, Stahlmann R, Schreiner M.

Arch Toxicol. 2016 Apr;90(4):927-36. doi: 10.1007/s00204-015-1527-4. Epub 2015 May 16.

PMID:
25975990
13.

The local lymph node assay: current position in the regulatory classification of skin sensitizing chemicals.

Basketter DA, Gerberick GF, Kimber I.

Cutan Ocul Toxicol. 2007;26(4):293-301.

PMID:
18058304
14.

Quantitative relationship between the local lymph node assay and human skin sensitization assays.

Schneider K, Akkan Z.

Regul Toxicol Pharmacol. 2004 Jun;39(3):245-55.

PMID:
15135206
15.

Assessment of the sensitization potential of five metal salts in the murine local lymph node assay.

Mandervelt C, Clottens FL, Demedts M, Nemery B.

Toxicology. 1997 Jun 6;120(1):65-73.

PMID:
9160110
16.

Skin sensitization testing in potency and risk assessment.

Kimber I, Basketter DA, Berthold K, Butler M, Garrigue JL, Lea L, Newsome C, Roggeband R, Steiling W, Stropp G, Waterman S, Wiemann C.

Toxicol Sci. 2001 Feb;59(2):198-208. Review.

PMID:
11158712
17.
18.

Sulphanilic acid: divergent results in the guinea pig maximization test and the local lymph node assay.

Basketter DA, Scholes EW, Cumberbatch M, Evans CD, Kimber I.

Contact Dermatitis. 1992 Oct;27(4):209-13.

PMID:
1451484
19.

Nothing is perfect, not even the local lymph node assay: a commentary and the implications for REACH.

Basketter DA, McFadden JF, Gerberick F, Cockshott A, Kimber I.

Contact Dermatitis. 2009 Feb;60(2):65-9. doi: 10.1111/j.1600-0536.2008.01444.x.

PMID:
19207375
20.

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