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Items: 1 to 20 of 660

1.

Weight gain, dietary restraint, and disordered eating in the freshman year of college.

Delinsky SS, Wilson GT.

Eat Behav. 2008 Jan;9(1):82-90. doi: 10.1016/j.eatbeh.2007.06.001. Epub 2007 Jun 20.

PMID:
18167326
2.

Who gains or who loses weight? Psychosocial factors among first-year university students.

Provencher V, Polivy J, Wintre MG, Pratt MW, Pancer SM, Birnie-Lefcovitch S, Adams GR.

Physiol Behav. 2009 Jan 8;96(1):135-41. doi: 10.1016/j.physbeh.2008.09.011. Epub 2008 Sep 16.

PMID:
18831979
3.

Disordered eating and the transition to college: a prospective study.

Vohs KD, Heatherton TF, Herrin M.

Int J Eat Disord. 2001 Apr;29(3):280-8.

PMID:
11262506
5.

Disordered eating in college freshman women: a prospective study.

Cooley E, Toray T.

J Am Coll Health. 2001 Mar;49(5):229-35.

PMID:
11337898
6.

The effects of stress on body weight: biological and psychological predictors of change in BMI.

Roberts C, Troop N, Connan F, Treasure J, Campbell IC.

Obesity (Silver Spring). 2007 Dec;15(12):3045-55. doi: 10.1038/oby.2007.363.

7.

Eating Disorder Examination Questionnaire (EDE-Q): norms for undergraduate women.

Luce KH, Crowther JH, Pole M.

Int J Eat Disord. 2008 Apr;41(3):273-6. doi: 10.1002/eat.20504.

PMID:
18213686
8.
9.

Rigid vs. flexible dieting: association with eating disorder symptoms in nonobese women.

Stewart TM, Williamson DA, White MA.

Appetite. 2002 Feb;38(1):39-44.

PMID:
11883916
10.
11.

Race, weight, and correlates of binge eating in female college students.

Napolitano MA, Himes S.

Eat Behav. 2011 Jan;12(1):29-36. doi: 10.1016/j.eatbeh.2010.09.003. Epub 2010 Sep 18.

PMID:
21184970
12.

Do emotion regulation difficulties when upset influence the association between dietary restraint and weight gain among college students?

Hunt TK, Forbush KT, Hagan KE, Chapa DAN.

Appetite. 2017 Jul 1;114:101-109. doi: 10.1016/j.appet.2017.03.029. Epub 2017 Mar 22.

PMID:
28341607
13.

Body image and eating disordered behavior in a community sample of Black and Hispanic women.

Hrabosky JI, Grilo CM.

Eat Behav. 2007 Jan;8(1):106-14. Epub 2006 Mar 6.

PMID:
17174858
14.

Overconcern with weight and shape is not the same as body dissatisfaction: evidence from a prospective study of pre-adolescent boys and girls.

Allen KL, Byrne SM, McLean NJ, Davis EA.

Body Image. 2008 Sep;5(3):261-70. doi: 10.1016/j.bodyim.2008.03.005. Epub 2008 Jun 27.

PMID:
18585990
15.

Dietary restraint and weight gain during pregnancy.

Conway R, Reddy S, Davies J.

Eur J Clin Nutr. 1999 Nov;53(11):849-53.

PMID:
10556996
16.

Changes in body weight, body composition and resting metabolic rate (RMR) in first-year university freshmen students.

Hajhosseini L, Holmes T, Mohamadi P, Goudarzi V, McProud L, Hollenbeck CB.

J Am Coll Nutr. 2006 Apr;25(2):123-7.

PMID:
16582028
17.

Risk for disordered eating relates to both gender and ethnicity for college students.

Hoerr SL, Bokram R, Lugo B, Bivins T, Keast DR.

J Am Coll Nutr. 2002 Aug;21(4):307-14.

PMID:
12166527
18.

A prospective study of disordered eating among sorority and nonsorority women.

Allison KC, Park CL.

Int J Eat Disord. 2004 Apr;35(3):354-8.

PMID:
15048951
19.

Freshman 15: fact or fiction?

Morrow ML, Heesch KC, Dinger MK, Hull HR, Kneehans AW, Fields DA.

Obesity (Silver Spring). 2006 Aug;14(8):1438-43.

20.

The freshman weight gain phenomenon revisited.

Crombie AP, Ilich JZ, Dutton GR, Panton LB, Abood DA.

Nutr Rev. 2009 Feb;67(2):83-94. doi: 10.1111/j.1753-4887.2008.00143.x. Review.

PMID:
19178649

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