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Items: 1 to 20 of 209

1.

The interplay of public health law and industry self-regulation: the case of sugar-sweetened beverage sales in schools.

Mello MM, Pomeranz J, Moran P.

Am J Public Health. 2008 Apr;98(4):595-604. Epub 2007 Sep 27. Review.

2.

Misperceptions of peer norms as a risk factor for sugar-sweetened beverage consumption among secondary school students.

Perkins JM, Perkins HW, Craig DW.

J Am Diet Assoc. 2010 Dec;110(12):1916-21. doi: 10.1016/j.jada.2010.09.008.

PMID:
21111101
3.

Advanced policy options to regulate sugar-sweetened beverages to support public health.

Pomeranz JL.

J Public Health Policy. 2012 Feb;33(1):75-88. doi: 10.1057/jphp.2011.46. Epub 2011 Aug 25. Review.

PMID:
21866177
4.

School vending machine use and fast-food restaurant use are associated with sugar-sweetened beverage intake in youth.

Wiecha JL, Finkelstein D, Troped PJ, Fragala M, Peterson KE.

J Am Diet Assoc. 2006 Oct;106(10):1624-30.

PMID:
17000195
5.

Reduced availability of sugar-sweetened beverages and diet soda has a limited impact on beverage consumption patterns in Maine high school youth.

Blum JE, Davee AM, Beaudoin CM, Jenkins PL, Kaley LA, Wigand DA.

J Nutr Educ Behav. 2008 Nov-Dec;40(6):341-7. doi: 10.1016/j.jneb.2007.12.004.

PMID:
18984489
6.

Feasibility and impact of placing water coolers on sales of sugar-sweetened beverages in Dutch secondary school canteens.

Visscher TL, van Hal WC, Blokdijk L, Seidell JC, Renders CM, Bemelmans WJ.

Obes Facts. 2010;3(2):109-15. doi: 10.1159/000300848. Epub 2010 Apr 16.

7.

Limiting the consumption of sugar sweetened beverages in Mexico's obesogenic environment: a qualitative policy review and stakeholder analysis.

Moise N, Cifuentes E, Orozco E, Willett W.

J Public Health Policy. 2011 Nov;32(4):458-75. doi: 10.1057/jphp.2011.39. Epub 2011 Jun 9. Review.

PMID:
21654826
8.

Sponsorship of physical activity programs by the sweetened beverages industry: public health or public relations?

Gómez L, Jacoby E, Ibarra L, Lucumí D, Hernandez A, Parra D, Florindo A, Hallal P.

Rev Saude Publica. 2011 Apr;45(2):423-7. Epub 2011 Jan 21. English, Spanish.

9.

Estimating the potential of taxes on sugar-sweetened beverages to reduce consumption and generate revenue.

Andreyeva T, Chaloupka FJ, Brownell KD.

Prev Med. 2011 Jun;52(6):413-6. doi: 10.1016/j.ypmed.2011.03.013. Epub 2011 Apr 3.

PMID:
21443899
10.

Reduction in sugar-sweetened beverages is not associated with more water or diet drinks.

Veitch J, Singh A, van Stralen MM, van Mechelen W, Brug J, Chinapaw MJ.

Public Health Nutr. 2011 Aug;14(8):1388-93. doi: 10.1017/S1368980010002727. Epub 2010 Oct 29.

PMID:
21029506
11.

Association between district and state policies and US public elementary school competitive food and beverage environments.

Chriqui JF, Turner L, Taber DR, Chaloupka FJ.

JAMA Pediatr. 2013 Aug 1;167(8):714-22. doi: 10.1001/jamapediatrics.2013.32.

PMID:
23753810
12.

Trends in Sugar-Sweetened Beverages: Are Public Health and the Market Aligned or in Conflict?

Shrapnel W.

Nutrients. 2015 Sep 23;7(9):8189-98. doi: 10.3390/nu7095390.

13.

Effect of school district policy change on consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages among high school students, Boston, Massachusetts, 2004-2006.

Cradock AL, McHugh A, Mont-Ferguson H, Grant L, Barrett JL, Wang YC, Gortmaker SL.

Prev Chronic Dis. 2011 Jul;8(4):A74. Epub 2011 Jun 15.

14.

Factors affecting sugar-sweetened beverage availability in competitive venues of US secondary schools.

Terry-McElrath YM, O'Malley PM, Johnston LD.

J Sch Health. 2012 Jan;82(1):44-55. doi: 10.1111/j.1746-1561.2011.00666.x.

15.

Increasing caloric contribution from sugar-sweetened beverages and 100% fruit juices among US children and adolescents, 1988-2004.

Wang YC, Bleich SN, Gortmaker SL.

Pediatrics. 2008 Jun;121(6):e1604-14. doi: 10.1542/peds.2007-2834.

PMID:
18519465
16.

Sugar-sweetened beverages and obesity: the potential impact of public policies.

Chaloupka FJ, Powell LM, Chriqui JF.

J Policy Anal Manage. 2011 Summer;30(3):645-55. No abstract available.

PMID:
21774165
17.

Policies that restrict sweetened beverage availability may reduce consumption in elementary-school children.

Jones SJ, Gonzalez W, Frongillo EA.

Public Health Nutr. 2010 Apr;13(4):589-95. doi: 10.1017/S1368980009991819. Epub 2009 Oct 28.

PMID:
19860991
19.

Impact of school district sugar-sweetened beverage policies on student beverage exposure and consumption in middle schools.

Johnson DB, Bruemmer B, Lund AE, Evens CC, Mar CM.

J Adolesc Health. 2009 Sep;45(3 Suppl):S30-7. doi: 10.1016/j.jadohealth.2009.03.008. Epub 2009 Jun 4.

PMID:
19699434
20.

The worldwide battle against soft drinks in schools.

Hawkes C.

Am J Prev Med. 2010 Apr;38(4):457-61. doi: 10.1016/j.amepre.2010.01.011.

PMID:
20307815

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