Format
Sort by
Items per page

Send to

Choose Destination

Links from PubMed

Items: 1 to 20 of 95

1.

Lipoprotein-dependent and -independent immune responses to spirochetal infection.

Salazar JC, Pope CD, Moore MW, Pope J, Kiely TG, Radolf JD.

Clin Diagn Lab Immunol. 2005 Aug;12(8):949-58.

2.

Coevolution of markers of innate and adaptive immunity in skin and peripheral blood of patients with erythema migrans.

Salazar JC, Pope CD, Sellati TJ, Feder HM Jr, Kiely TG, Dardick KR, Buckman RL, Moore MW, Caimano MJ, Pope JG, Krause PJ, Radolf JD; Lyme Disease Network.

J Immunol. 2003 Sep 1;171(5):2660-70. Erratum in: J Immunol. 2003 Nov 1;171(9):4934.

3.

The cutaneous response in humans to Treponema pallidum lipoprotein analogues involves cellular elements of both innate and adaptive immunity.

Sellati TJ, Waldrop SL, Salazar JC, Bergstresser PR, Picker LJ, Radolf JD.

J Immunol. 2001 Mar 15;166(6):4131-40.

5.

Treponema pallidum elicits innate and adaptive cellular immune responses in skin and blood during secondary syphilis: a flow-cytometric analysis.

Salazar JC, Cruz AR, Pope CD, Valderrama L, Trujillo R, Saravia NG, Radolf JD.

J Infect Dis. 2007 Mar 15;195(6):879-87. Epub 2007 Feb 5.

6.

Treponema pallidum and Borrelia burgdorferi lipoproteins and synthetic lipopeptides activate monocytic cells via a CD14-dependent pathway distinct from that used by lipopolysaccharide.

Sellati TJ, Bouis DA, Kitchens RL, Darveau RP, Pugin J, Ulevitch RJ, Gangloff SC, Goyert SM, Norgard MV, Radolf JD.

J Immunol. 1998 Jun 1;160(11):5455-64.

7.

Treponema pallidum and Borrelia burgdorferi lipoproteins and synthetic lipopeptides activate monocytes/macrophages.

Radolf JD, Arndt LL, Akins DR, Curetty LL, Levi ME, Shen Y, Davis LS, Norgard MV.

J Immunol. 1995 Mar 15;154(6):2866-77.

PMID:
7876555
8.

Dermal inflammation elicited by synthetic analogs of Treponema pallidum and Borrelia burgdorferi lipoproteins.

Norgard MV, Riley BS, Richardson JA, Radolf JD.

Infect Immun. 1995 Apr;63(4):1507-15.

9.

Microbial lipopeptides stimulate dendritic cell maturation via Toll-like receptor 2.

Hertz CJ, Kiertscher SM, Godowski PJ, Bouis DA, Norgard MV, Roth MD, Modlin RL.

J Immunol. 2001 Feb 15;166(4):2444-50.

10.

Phagocytosis of Borrelia burgdorferi and Treponema pallidum potentiates innate immune activation and induces gamma interferon production.

Moore MW, Cruz AR, LaVake CJ, Marzo AL, Eggers CH, Salazar JC, Radolf JD.

Infect Immun. 2007 Apr;75(4):2046-62. Epub 2007 Jan 12.

12.

Induction of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines by Borrelia burgdorferi lipoproteins in monocytes is mediated by CD14.

Giambartolomei GH, Dennis VA, Lasater BL, Philipp MT.

Infect Immun. 1999 Jan;67(1):140-7.

13.

Activation of monocytes by three OspA vaccine candidates: lipoprotein OspA is a potent stimulator of monokines.

Häupl T, Landgraf S, Netusil P, Biller N, Capiau C, Desmons P, Hauser P, Burmester GR.

FEMS Immunol Med Microbiol. 1997 Sep;19(1):15-23.

14.
15.

Prominent T cell response to a selectively in vivo expressed Borrelia burgdorferi outer surface protein (pG) in patients with Lyme disease.

Bauer Y, Hofmann H, Jahraus O, Mytilineos J, Simon MM, Wallich R.

Eur J Immunol. 2001 Mar;31(3):767-76.

16.

Activation of human monocytes by live Borrelia burgdorferi generates TLR2-dependent and -independent responses which include induction of IFN-beta.

Salazar JC, Duhnam-Ems S, La Vake C, Cruz AR, Moore MW, Caimano MJ, Velez-Climent L, Shupe J, Krueger W, Radolf JD.

PLoS Pathog. 2009 May;5(5):e1000444. doi: 10.1371/journal.ppat.1000444. Epub 2009 May 22.

17.
18.

Outer surface lipoproteins of Borrelia burgdorferi stimulate nitric oxide production by the cytokine-inducible pathway.

Ma Y, Seiler KP, Tai KF, Yang L, Woods M, Weis JJ.

Infect Immun. 1994 Sep;62(9):3663-71.

20.

The lipid component of lipoproteins from Borrelia burgdorferi: structural analysis, antigenicity, and presentation via human dendritic cells.

Beermann C, Lochnit G, Geyer R, Groscurth P, Filgueira L.

Biochem Biophys Res Commun. 2000 Jan 27;267(3):897-905.

PMID:
10673388

Supplemental Content

Support Center