Format
Sort by
Items per page

Send to

Choose Destination

Links from PubMed

Items: 1 to 20 of 102

1.

Specific modulation of nongenomic androgen signaling in the ovary.

White SN, Jamnongjit M, Gill A, Lutz LB, Hammes SR.

Steroids. 2005 May-Jun;70(5-7):352-60. Epub 2005 Mar 16.

PMID:
15862817
2.

Evidence that androgens are the primary steroids produced by Xenopus laevis ovaries and may signal through the classical androgen receptor to promote oocyte maturation.

Lutz LB, Cole LM, Gupta MK, Kwist KW, Auchus RJ, Hammes SR.

Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2001 Nov 20;98(24):13728-33. Epub 2001 Nov 13.

3.

Selective modulation of genomic and nongenomic androgen responses by androgen receptor ligands.

Lutz LB, Jamnongjit M, Yang WH, Jahani D, Gill A, Hammes SR.

Mol Endocrinol. 2003 Jun;17(6):1106-16. Epub 2003 Mar 13.

PMID:
12637588
4.
7.

Steroids and oocyte maturation--a new look at an old story.

Hammes SR.

Mol Endocrinol. 2004 Apr;18(4):769-75. Epub 2003 Nov 20. Review.

PMID:
14630999
8.
9.

Nongenomic steroid-triggered oocyte maturation: of mice and frogs.

Deng J, Carbajal L, Evaul K, Rasar M, Jamnongjit M, Hammes SR.

Steroids. 2009 Jul;74(7):595-601. doi: 10.1016/j.steroids.2008.11.010. Epub 2008 Nov 24. Review.

10.

Understanding extranuclear (nongenomic) androgen signaling: what a frog oocyte can tell us about human biology.

Sen A, Prizant H, Hammes SR.

Steroids. 2011 Aug;76(9):822-8. doi: 10.1016/j.steroids.2011.02.016. Epub 2011 Feb 25. Review.

11.

Environmental (anti-)androgenic chemicals affect germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD) of Xenopus laevis oocytes in vitro.

Cao S, Xu W, Lou QQ, Zhang YF, Zhao YX, Wei WJ, Qin ZF.

Toxicol In Vitro. 2014 Apr;28(3):426-31. doi: 10.1016/j.tiv.2013.12.003. Epub 2013 Dec 21.

PMID:
24362045
12.

The physiology of the Xenopus laevis ovary.

Rasar MA, Hammes SR.

Methods Mol Biol. 2006;322:17-30. Review.

PMID:
16739713
13.

Xenopus laevis CYP17 regulates androgen biosynthesis independent of the cofactor cytochrome b5.

Yang WH, Hammes SR.

J Biol Chem. 2005 Mar 18;280(11):10196-201. Epub 2005 Jan 7.

14.
15.
16.

Naturally occurring steroids in Xenopus oocyte during meiotic maturation. Unexpected presence and role of steroid sulfates.

Haccard O, Dupré A, Liere P, Pianos A, Eychenne B, Jessus C, Ozon R.

Mol Cell Endocrinol. 2012 Oct 15;362(1-2):110-9. doi: 10.1016/j.mce.2012.05.019. Epub 2012 Jun 9.

PMID:
22687883
17.

Steroidal androgens and nonsteroidal, tissue-selective androgen receptor modulator, S-22, regulate androgen receptor function through distinct genomic and nongenomic signaling pathways.

Narayanan R, Coss CC, Yepuru M, Kearbey JD, Miller DD, Dalton JT.

Mol Endocrinol. 2008 Nov;22(11):2448-65. doi: 10.1210/me.2008-0160. Epub 2008 Sep 18.

PMID:
18801930
18.

The classical progesterone receptor mediates Xenopus oocyte maturation through a nongenomic mechanism.

Bayaa M, Booth RA, Sheng Y, Liu XJ.

Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2000 Nov 7;97(23):12607-12.

20.

Paxillin and embryonic PolyAdenylation Binding Protein (ePABP) engage to regulate androgen-dependent Xenopus laevis oocyte maturation - A model of kinase-dependent regulation of protein expression.

Miedlich SU, Taya M, Young MR, Hammes SR.

Mol Cell Endocrinol. 2017 Jun 15;448:87-97. doi: 10.1016/j.mce.2017.03.028. Epub 2017 Mar 28.

PMID:
28359799

Supplemental Content

Support Center