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Items: 1 to 20 of 211

1.

Yersinia outer proteins: role in modulation of host cell signaling responses and pathogenesis.

Viboud GI, Bliska JB.

Annu Rev Microbiol. 2005;59:69-89. Review.

PMID:
15847602
2.

Contribution of the major secreted yops of Yersinia enterocolitica O:8 to pathogenicity in the mouse infection model.

Trülzsch K, Sporleder T, Igwe EI, Rüssmann H, Heesemann J.

Infect Immun. 2004 Sep;72(9):5227-34.

3.

The Yersinia Yop virulon: a bacterial system for subverting eukaryotic cells.

Cornelis GR, Wolf-Watz H.

Mol Microbiol. 1997 Mar;23(5):861-7. Review.

4.

The virulence plasmid of Yersinia, an antihost genome.

Cornelis GR, Boland A, Boyd AP, Geuijen C, Iriarte M, Neyt C, Sory MP, Stainier I.

Microbiol Mol Biol Rev. 1998 Dec;62(4):1315-52. Review.

5.

Cellular mechanisms of bacterial internalization counteracted by Yersinia.

Fällman M, Gustavsson A.

Int Rev Cytol. 2005;246:135-88. Review.

PMID:
16164968
6.

Modulation of Rho GTPases and the actin cytoskeleton by Yersinia outer proteins (Yops).

Aepfelbacher M, Heesemann J.

Int J Med Microbiol. 2001 Sep;291(4):269-76. Review.

PMID:
11680787
7.

Analysis of chaperone-dependent Yop secretion/translocation and effector function using a mini-virulence plasmid of Yersinia enterocolitica.

Trülzsch K, Roggenkamp A, Aepfelbacher M, Wilharm G, Ruckdeschel K, Heesemann J.

Int J Med Microbiol. 2003 Jun;293(2-3):167-77.

PMID:
12868653
8.

The Yersinia Yop virulon, a bacterial system to subvert cells of the primary host defense.

Cornelis GR.

Folia Microbiol (Praha). 1998;43(3):253-61. Review.

PMID:
9717252
10.

The Functions of Effector Proteins in Yersinia Virulence.

Zhang L, Mei M, Yu C, Shen W, Ma L, He J, Yi L.

Pol J Microbiol. 2016;65(1):5-12. Review.

11.

Type III secretion decreases bacterial and host survival following phagocytosis of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis by macrophages.

Zhang Y, Murtha J, Roberts MA, Siegel RM, Bliska JB.

Infect Immun. 2008 Sep;76(9):4299-310. doi: 10.1128/IAI.00183-08. Epub 2008 Jun 30.

12.

In vitro association between the virulence proteins, YopD and YopE, of Yersinia enterocolitica.

Hartland EL, Robins-Browne RM.

FEMS Microbiol Lett. 1998 May 15;162(2):207-13.

14.

Crosstalk of signalling processes of innate immunity with Yersinia Yop effector functions.

Ruckdeschel K, Deuretzbacher A, Haase R.

Immunobiology. 2008;213(3-4):261-9. doi: 10.1016/j.imbio.2007.11.001. Epub 2007 Dec 31. Review.

PMID:
18406372
15.

Uncovering an Important Role for YopJ in the Inhibition of Caspase-1 in Activated Macrophages and Promoting Yersinia pseudotuberculosis Virulence.

Schoberle TJ, Chung LK, McPhee JB, Bogin B, Bliska JB.

Infect Immun. 2016 Mar 24;84(4):1062-72. doi: 10.1128/IAI.00843-15. Print 2016 Apr.

17.

Destabilization of YopE by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway fine-tunes Yop delivery into host cells and facilitates systemic spread of Yersinia enterocolitica in host lymphoid tissue.

Gaus K, Hentschke M, Czymmeck N, Novikova L, Trülzsch K, Valentin-Weigand P, Aepfelbacher M, Ruckdeschel K.

Infect Immun. 2011 Mar;79(3):1166-75. doi: 10.1128/IAI.00694-10. Epub 2010 Dec 13.

18.

Characterization of outer membrane proteins of Yersinia pestis and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis strains isolated from India.

Khushiramani R, Tuteja U, Shukla J, Batra HV.

Indian J Exp Biol. 2004 May;42(5):508-14.

PMID:
15233478
19.

Virulence plasmid-encoded YopK is essential for Yersinia pseudotuberculosis to cause systemic infection in mice.

Holmström A, Rosqvist R, Wolf-Watz H, Forsberg A.

Infect Immun. 1995 Jun;63(6):2269-76.

20.

Yersinia enterocolitica targets cells of the innate and adaptive immune system by injection of Yops in a mouse infection model.

Köberle M, Klein-Günther A, Schütz M, Fritz M, Berchtold S, Tolosa E, Autenrieth IB, Bohn E.

PLoS Pathog. 2009 Aug;5(8):e1000551. doi: 10.1371/journal.ppat.1000551. Epub 2009 Aug 14.

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