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Items: 1 to 20 of 131

1.

Clinical applications of EPR: overview and perspectives.

Swartz HM, Khan N, Buckey J, Comi R, Gould L, Grinberg O, Hartford A, Hopf H, Hou H, Hug E, Iwasaki A, Lesniewski P, Salikhov I, Walczak T.

NMR Biomed. 2004 Aug;17(5):335-51. Review.

PMID:
15366033
2.

The measurement of oxygen in vivo using EPR techniques.

Swartz HM, Clarkson RB.

Phys Med Biol. 1998 Jul;43(7):1957-75. Review.

PMID:
9703059
3.

In vivo EPR: when, how and why?

Gallez B, Swartz HM.

NMR Biomed. 2004 Aug;17(5):223-5.

PMID:
15366024
4.

Assessment of tumor oxygenation by electron paramagnetic resonance: principles and applications.

Gallez B, Baudelet C, Jordan BF.

NMR Biomed. 2004 Aug;17(5):240-62. Review.

PMID:
15366026
5.

Tissue oxygenation in sepsis; new insights from in vivo EPR.

James PE, Thomas MP, Jackson SK.

NMR Biomed. 2004 Aug;17(5):319-26. Review.

PMID:
15366031
6.

Detection of bioradicals by in vivo L-band electron spin resonance spectrometry.

Fujii H, Berliner LJ.

NMR Biomed. 2004 Aug;17(5):311-8. Review.

PMID:
15366030
7.

In vivo EPR dosimetry to quantify exposures to clinically significant doses of ionising radiation.

Swartz HM, Iwasaki A, Walczak T, Demidenko E, Salikhov I, Khan N, Lesniewski P, Thomas J, Romanyukha A, Schauer D, Starewicz P.

Radiat Prot Dosimetry. 2006;120(1-4):163-70. Epub 2006 Apr 27. Review.

PMID:
16644994
9.
10.

Cardiac applications of EPR imaging.

Kuppusamy P, Zweier JL.

NMR Biomed. 2004 Aug;17(5):226-39. Review.

PMID:
15366025
11.

Applications of in vivo electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy: measurements of pO2 and NO in endotoxin shock.

Jackson SK, Madhani M, Thomas M, Timmins GS, James PE.

Toxicol Lett. 2001 Mar 31;120(1-3):253-7.

PMID:
11323183
12.

In vivo EPR spectroscopy of free radicals in the heart.

Zweier JL, Kuppusamy P.

Environ Health Perspect. 1994 Dec;102 Suppl 10:45-51.

13.

In vivo electron paramagnetic resonance oximetry with particulate materials.

Dunn JF, Swartz HM.

Methods. 2003 Jun;30(2):159-66.

PMID:
12725782
14.
15.

Electron paramagnetic resonance as a unique tool for skin and hair research.

Plonka PM.

Exp Dermatol. 2009 May;18(5):472-84. doi: 10.1111/j.1600-0625.2009.00883.x. Review.

PMID:
19368555
16.

Measurements of clinically significant doses of ionizing radiation using non-invasive in vivo EPR spectroscopy of teeth in situ.

Swartz HM, Iwasaki A, Walczak T, Demidenko E, Salikov I, Lesniewski P, Starewicz P, Schauer D, Romanyukha A.

Appl Radiat Isot. 2005 Feb;62(2):293-9.

PMID:
15607464
17.

A naphthalocyanine-based EPR probe for localized measurements of tissue oxygenation.

Ilangovan G, Manivannan A, Li H, Yanagi H, Zweier JL, Kuppusamy P.

Free Radic Biol Med. 2002 Jan 15;32(2):139-47.

PMID:
11796202
18.

Cerebral tissue oxygenation in reversible focal ischemia in rats: multi-site EPR oximetry measurements.

Hou H, Grinberg OY, Grinberg SA, Demidenko E, Swartz HM.

Physiol Meas. 2005 Feb;26(1):131-41.

PMID:
15742885
19.

Preparation and EPR studies of lithium phthalocyanine radical as an oxymetric probe.

Afeworki M, Miller NR, Devasahayam N, Cook J, Mitchell JB, Subramanian S, Krishna MC.

Free Radic Biol Med. 1998 Jul 1;25(1):72-8.

PMID:
9655524
20.

High-field EPR spectroscopy applied to biological systems: characterization of molecular switches for electron and ion transfer.

Möbius K, Savitsky A, Schnegg A, Plato M, Fuchst M.

Phys Chem Chem Phys. 2005 Jan 7;7(1):19-42.

PMID:
19785170

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